Pelican Feeding on Kangaroo Island with Zeb and Eider Duck

On the way to Kingscote for the Pelican Feeding, we passed grapevines.

Grape vines trimmed back for winter

Grape vines trimmed back for winter

There are many wineries on Kangaroo Island.   Our guide also pointed out some termite hills.  The Kangaroo Island Heath Goanna Lizard is very smart.   The lizard lays the eggs in the termite hill.   The temperature inside the hill is perfect for incubating eggs.   Eight months later, in the spring, the eggs hatch and the mother lizard is there to help the new born lizards as they emerge from the termite hill.

Termite hill on Kangaroo Island

Termite hill on Kangaroo Island

Zeb and Eider went to a pelican feeding.

Australian Pelican

Australian Pelican

It was our first pelican feeding.  Arriving at the pier in Kingscote, we sat in the viewing area.   There were so many pelicans waiting for food.

Many pelicans

Many pelicans

Soon the man arrived with a huge container of fish.

Box of fish for pelicans

Box of fish for pelicans

The pelicans gathered around him as he talked to us.   These pelicans are different than the U.S. pelicans.

Eager pelicans

Eager pelicans

We have brown pelicans and the man said ours are a little smaller.   Soon the feeding began.

Man talking while pelicans get some fish

Man talking while pelicans get some fish.   Nice hat!

We loved to see all the pelicans.   They are so pretty

Pelicans patiently waiting

Pelicans patiently waiting

We really liked the pelican feeding and we really liked the pelicans.

Zeb and Soapy Visit Denver Botanical Gardens to See Stinky

I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck took our moms to the Denver Botanical Gardens Wednesday night.    Stinky was in bloom.   Stinky is a Corpse Flower and it does stink.   This plant, native to the rainforest of Sumatra, Indonesia came to the Denver Botanical Gardens in 2007.   This is the first time it has bloomed.

Stinky at Denver Botanical Gardens

Stinky at Denver Botanical Gardens

The plants are 7 – 10 years old before they first bloom.   The flower last 24-36 hours.    The flower does smell, like rotten meat.   Yuck!   But this does not happen often, so we wanted to see and smell it for ourselves.   However, everyone else in the Denver must think like we do.

The time standing in line to see and smell Stinky was about 6 hours all day.

Long lines to enter Denver Botanical Gardens

Long lines to enter Denver Botanical Gardens

We went about 10 p.m. trying to avoid the lines.   But, that did not happen.   When we arrived, the lady told us they were not admitting anyone else.   We would have been waiting until about  4 a.m.   But she did give each human a free pas, so we could return tomorrow, or any other day to visit the Denver Botanical Gardens.

Free passes so we can go back

Free passes so we can go back

We were disappointed, but it was very nice of them to give us a free pass to return.      We heard that a Corpse Flower in Chicago will bloom soon, also.      This plant is from the same family as the Calla Lily.   Because of this special event, the flower of the Corpse Flower, the Denver Botanical Gardens stayed open until midnight Wednesday.   They will open Thursday at 6:00 a.m. and will not close until midnight.   The flower does not last long, so Friday the Botanical Gardens of Denver will go back to their regular hours.

Corpse flower

Corpse flower

We hope you can visit the Denver Botanical Gardens to see this flower.

You don’t want to wait another 7-10 years for the next flower.   These photos of the corpse flower came from the internet and from Twitter.   We hope you get to see it personally.

Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park with Zeb and Eider Duck

We entered Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park and were greeted by these kangaroos.

Our kangaroo greeters

Our kangaroo greeters

These were the first white kangaroo we saw.   Aren’t they adorable?

Aren't they adorable. Our first white kangaroos

Aren’t they adorable. Our first white kangaroos

Soon the humans were given kangaroo food and the kangaroos were ready.

They like humans to feed them

They like humans to feed them

These guys are so gentle with humans.   They like people.

These kangaroos like humans

These kangaroos like humans

And they like ducks.

Kangaroos and ducks meet

Kangaroos and ducks meet

This white peacock was watching us.

White peacock

White peacock

Watch out!   This is a common tiger snake, but it is one of the most poisonous and dangerous snakes in Australia

Tiger Snake--very poisonous!

Tiger Snake–very poisonous!

We saw many colorful birds, but we really liked the Southern Cassowary.

Southern Cassowary

Southern Cassowary

This is the smallest penguin.

Fairy penguin or Little Penguin

Fairy penguin or Little Penguin

They are sometimes known as Fairy Penguins, and sometimes called Little Penguins.    Here are the koalas.

Koala at rest

Koala at rest

Koalas sleep about 20 hours each day, but this guy was awake and moving.

Koala on the move

Koala on the move

He wanted the humans to touch him.

Koala likes humans

Koala likes humans

Isn’t he just too cute?   Another snake is here.

Snakes are not all bad

Snakes are not all bad

This one is not poisonous.   Our humans touch it.   They like the snake.   One of the ladies on our tour is holding this baby kangaroo?

Baby kangaroo likes humans also

Baby kangaroo likes humans also

It is so cute.   We hope you visit an animal park here or near your home soon.   It is fun!

It is Football Season

Tonight the Denver Broncos go to Seattle to play the Seattle Seahawks at Century Link Field at 8:00 p.m Denver time.   This is the first preseason game for the Denver Broncos this season, with one of the most expensive preseason ticket price.   It seems that resale of tickets for Friday’s game will cost about $119.   We, the Colorado Traveling Ducks, wish the Broncos a win, but we will not be going to Seattle for the game.    GO BRONCOS!!!

Raptor Domain Birds of Prey on Kangaroo Island with Zeb and Eider Duck

We liked Raptor Domain Birds of Prey.

Raptor Domain

Raptor Domain

We saw the raptor demonstration but we also enjoyed the figures on the trees and on the ground.   This Echidna is not real,

Echidna

Echidna

but we did see a real one on an evening nocturnal wildlife hike.   This is a really big bee.

A really big bee

A really big bee

Hey mom!   Why are we sitting on a branch with this snake?

We are with a snake??

We are with a snake??

Let’s go down the path to the raptor demonstration.

Down the Path

Down the Path

The birds are trained to return to the arm of the trainer.   We like black and white birds.

These birds are so pretty

These birds are so pretty

Here is tawny frogmouth.

Tawny Frogmouth

Tawny Frogmouth

We liked to watch this one walk with the long legs.

Such long legs

Such long legs

This snowy barn owl sat on people’s lap.

Snowy Barn Owl

Snowy Barn Owl

Snowy Barn Owl has no fear of humans.

Friendly Snowy Barn Owl

Friendly Snowy Barn Owl

He has long claws or talons, but he did not hurt people or ducks.   We like these kookaburras.

Kookaburras

Kookaburras

They are not birds of prey.   They are from the King Fisher Family, but we were happy to see them.   We also saw the Black Breasted Buzzard.

Black Breasted Buzzard

Black Breasted Buzzard

He loves to eat green emu eggs, but the shells are very hard.   The Black Breasted Buzzard knows to pick up a rock and break the egg.   He did enjoy his egg.   The humans missed that photo.   This is an Australian eagle.

Australian Eagle

Australian Eagle

We like seeing all these birds.   They are different than the birds we see in our yard in Colorado.   On the way out of the Raptor Domain we admired these lady bugs on the tree.

Lady Bugs on the tree

Lady Bugs on the tree

We liked our visit to the Raptor Domain Birds of Prey and we think you would like it too.

Seal Bay on Kangaroo Bay with Zeb and Eider Duck

We are going to Seal Bay, in a National Park.

Seal Bay is part of a National Park

Seal Bay is part of a National Park

Humans and duck will see the Australian Sea Lions.   We are visiting the third largest breeding colony in Australia.   Before we even get to the beach, we see this mom and baby sea lion in the bush.

Mom and Baby resting under a bush

Mom and Baby resting under a bush

We are quiet and keep our distance.   We do not want to disturb them.   We follow our guide down to the beach.

We follow our guide

We follow our guide

This sea lion is watching us watch him.

He knows we are here

He knows we are here

Thinking about a swim?

Ready for  swim

Ready for swim

They are swimming and playing in the water.

Fun at the beach

Fun at the beach

We like being on the beach with the sea lions.

Love the beach with sea lions

Love the beach with sea lions

However, if you do not want to walk on the beach, you can walk on this path and see the sea lions.

Humans can walk on this boardwalk for a different view

Humans can walk on this boardwalk for a different view

Looking down on beach and frolicking sea lions.

View from boardwalk

View from boardwalk

This young one is ready for a nap.

Tired

Tired

Aren’t they adorable?

Picture perfect

Picture perfect

We really like the sea lions.

Our new friends

Our new friends

Group nap time.

Group nap

Group nap

Sea lions must share the each with birds also.

Birds on the beach also

Birds on the beach also

We are off the beach now; heading to our bus, but we must have one last look back at the ocean.

So nice here.   Hard to leave

So nice here. Hard to leave