Northern Rockies Lodge, a Bear, and Colorado Traveling Ducks

Continuing south, I was looking forward to our next hotel.   We had reservations at the Northern Rockies Lodge again.   I love that place.   Here is a group of buffalo grazing on the side of the road.

Buffalo gazing

We always see buffalo along this part of the road.   I love them.   They are so big and every time we pass through here we see baby buffalo.   Of course, we have only been here in May and June.     Here is beautiful Muncho Lake.

Muncho Lake

This sign explains why the water seems green.

Such a beautiful color for the lake

The colors of nature are so beautiful.   We love this drive because we see so much of nature, untouched by humans.   We have arrived.

This is the view from the balcony of my room.

From our balcony

It seems like we always need to go somewhere and can only stay here at Northern Rockies Lodge for one night.   But we do spend more time here the next day, so everything is good.   We stay in the main lodge, but there is a camp ground and several cabins.

Cabins for rent

Mom takes around the lake.   There is so much more open water now compared to when we stopped here going north.   The ice is melting.

Muncho Lake

We just love the reflection of clouds and mountain in the lake.

Muncho Lake

The colors are so vivid.   Just beautiful.   It is a sunny day so mom has us, ducks and Chloe, by the lake.   Soapy’s mom is getting food from the restaurant and we will have a picnic by Muncho Lake.

Soapy’s mom is bringing food from restaurant. We will have a picnic lunch by Muncho Lake

We are at the table, just waiting for food.

Soapy’s mom bringing lunch

Soapy’s mom brings the food.   We eat and enjoy watching the lake and shore, but what is this??

A bear coming around the curve.

Coming around the bend in the shoreline, a black bear strolls into the lodge grounds.   We were just walking there about 30 minutes ago.  That is the same curve we saw behind Soapy’s mom carrying our lunch.    Did the bear see us, Colorado Traveling Ducks and Chloe?   Did he smell our lunch?  The bear keeps heading towards us.

Keeps coming. Used a little zoom here. Not quite that close.

Mom used the camera’s zoom.   He was close, but certainly not that close.  But he looks so cute and cuddly.   Then he turns and goes between the cabins.   We decide is time to leave the lake area and head to the lodge.  Our Chloe was very cool.   We know she saw the bear, but she just acted like she saw nothing.   And the bear also acted like he saw nothing.   This definitely is bear country.   We saw 13 bear by the road as we drove here yesterday.

One of 13 bears by the road yesterday. We love them all.

We walk back to the lodge and many tourists are talking about the bear.   He walked through the cabin area, using one of our favorite paths, crossed the road and wandered into the woods and out of sight.

Path between Muncho Lake and main road

This is a path, the one the bear used.   Well, lunch is eaten.  It is time for us to head south again.

Whitehorse, YT south to Watson Lake, YT with the Colorado Traveling Ducks

Arriving late in Whitehorse, I insisted on returning to my benches on the Yukon River.

Sun setting on the Yukon River

This is my favorite evening place in Whitehorse.   And it is after 10:00 p.m.   This is beautiful.   In the morning we drive south, time to return to Colorado.   This is a rest area we visited on the trip north.

Rest area

There was a snow storm then.   Nicer with some sun today.   Continuing south we cross a Yukon River Bridge.

Yukon River Bridge

This is a really long bridge.   One of the longest we have seen on the Alaska Highway.   Another rest area appealed to us and to Chloe, our Colorado Traveling Dog.

Another rest area by lake

We wandered through the trees and admired the lake.   Chloe loved running and frolicking here.  Watson Lake is a town in the southern Yukon Territory.   We always stop here for food and a motel.   A main attraction on the Alaska Highway is the Sign Post Forest.

How Sign Post Forest began

We are fascinated with the thousands of signs here.   It was accidentally started when a worker was injured while building the Alaska Highway.   He was a little homesick for his home in Danville, Illinois.   While recovering, he put up a sign for his hometown of Danville.  Soon others added signs from their hometowns.

Sign Post Forest

You can see there are thousands of signs here now.

Sign Post Forest

It was impossible for mom to get a photo with all of them.   So many, and in every direction.

Sign Post Forest

We forget to make and bring a sign to add, but look under the second license plate from Wyoming.

Card for Colorado Traveling Ducks

The business card with a blue border is ours.   It is for The Colorado Traveling Ducks.   And there is more.

Card for Arlington Medical Transcription

Under Soapy Smith Duck, you can see a business card for Arlington Medical Transcription.   That is Soapy’s mom’s business.   No big signs for us, but we did leave some cards to tell others we were here also.   The Sign Post Forest is one of the major tourist stops on the Alaska Highway.   Just fun to see signs from all over the world.   If you go, maybe bring a sign to add to the forest.

Skagway back to Whitehorse with the Colorado Traveling Ducks

Skagway was a lot of fun.   The South Klondike Highway takes us from Skagway, back to Canada, onto the Alaska Highway and into Whitehorse.   Our last look at Skagway is beautiful.

Skagway with cruise ship

A cruise ship is in port today and the sky is cloudy, adding a sense of adventure and uncertainty.

Birds gliding over Tiaya Inlet

Further along the Tiaya Inlet, the birds fly over the water toward the mountains.   Leaving Alaska, clearing Canadian customs, we stop at Goat Lake Hydroelectric Project.

Goat Lake Hydroelectric Project

Goat Lake is high in the mountains.   Much of Pitch Fork Falls is clear of ice.

Pitchfork Falls

We love waterfalls.   The mountain scenery is beautiful.   Such a large attraction for this drive.   Passing through Carcross, passing the Carcross Desert, we had to make another stop at Emerald Lake.

Emerald Lake

We love the colors of the lake.   It seems that we are back in bear country.

Black bear

This black bear is in no hurry as he grazes by the road.   Something white is moving on the side of the mountain.

Dall sheep

Dall sheep are common in this area.   This one has been jumping around eating any available vegetation.   A sudden start from this sheep, and a few rocks slide down the mountain onto the road.   Our mini rockslide.   But enough to get us to move on.   But more animals.

Two grizzlies

Another mom and cub grizzly bear.   We certainly are enjoying seeing the bears and other animals.   The mountain scenery along this road is spectacular.

Love the rugged, snowy mountains

We were not planning on a side trip to Skagway, but we are so glad we went.   Skagway is fun, but this drive is outstanding.   And no traffic.   We hope you see this area for yourself.   It is beautiful.

Farewell to Soapy at Gold Rush Cemetery, Skagway, Alaska

Sadly we are leaving Skagway.   But one more stop before we really leave.   Less than 2 miles from downtown Skagway is Gold Rush Cemetery.

Gold Rush Cemetery, Skagway, Alaska

This is the final resting place of Soapy Smith, the human.

Soapy Smith’s obituary

Quite the obituary.   Our Soapy Smith Duck wanted a photo with only him and his famous human.   This is a sad moment for Soapy Smith Duck.

Soapy Smith’s tombstone

Now for Frank H. Reid, the reason Soapy is resting here.

Frank H. Reid

The sign continued saying Reid died from the gunshot wound.  Credited with fatally shooting Soapy Smith, Reid is still considered a hero of Skagway.   Ried, the surveyor, was responsible for laying out the Skagway townsite in early 1898 and he named many of the streets in Skagway today.    Frank Reid, the town hero, has the tallest and biggest tombstone in the cemetery.

Large tombstone for Frank H. Reid

Plenty of room here for all our Colorado Traveling Ducks.   Of course the wild days of the gold rush provides many stories.

The Unknown Men

There are a few unknown men, but this story is the most interesting.

Tombstones of Unknowns

A couple tombstones for unknowns.   We believe one is our not successful bank robber.    The last tombstone that caught our attention is that of Martin Itjen and his wife, Lucy.   **

World’s largest golden nugget. Martin Itjen grave

This may be the world’s largest golden nugget.   Really a gold painted boulder, chained to a tree.   Martin created the ultimate tourist attractions.   **

Martin Itjen

Martin Itjen

These signs in Skagway’s Gold Rush Cemetery say it best.   Further research told of Martin taking his street cars to Hollywood to promote tourism to Skagway.   Martin was born in Germany, immigrated to Florida, then to Skagway to find his fortune.   That didn’t work out so well, so he became an undertaker, and then turned tour promoter.   Such a varied life he led.   Martin and Lucy Itjen were the last people buried in Skagway’s Gold Rush Cemetery.   A nice path leads from the graveyard, up the hillside, to Lower Reid Falls.

Lower Reid Falls

We all love the sounds of water.   And, yes, these falls were named for the town hero, Frank H. Reid.   Along the sides of the rock, we like these crevices.

Crevices in rocks at Lower Reid Falls

The vegetation is rain forest type; the temperate climate from the water makes this an interesting place to visit.   Before we leave, one more photo.

Lower Reid Falls

Mom must have taken scores of waterfall photos, but I told her, only two can go in this blog post.   After all, this is Colorado Traveling Ducks, not humans.

The Red Onion Saloon in Skagway, Alaska

The moms are discussing the Red Onion Saloon and a “quickie” for the brothel.   What?   A quickie at a brothel?   That does not sound good.   But, we are going to the Red Onion Saloon.

Red Onion Saloon

Now we ducks see the sign for a “quickie” brothel tour.   In the gold rush days, Diamond Lil Davenport, was the owner and madam of the Red Onion.   It was a classy bar and brothel.   OK.   We are ready for our tour.   Here is our guide.

Our guide. Stairway to Heaven

She is standing on the Stairway to Heaven and we will follow her.   This is the small room where one of the working girls lived.

Small room for working girl

A customer would enter the Red Onion and choose a doll.   The dolls resembled the working girls.   Dolls wore similar clothes, same hair and eye color and resembled the live girls.   When chosen, the doll would be turned around, to indicate the lady was no longer available at the time.   The gentleman was escorted to her room and the business transaction occurred.   When they were finished and the time was expired, the girl would drop the gold coins through a hole in the floor.   The noise of the arriving coins told the bartender that the lady was once again available.   The doll was turned around and the process began again.   The gentlemen were only allowed on the upper floor if escorted by an employee or in the room with the lady.

Working uniform

Perhaps this was a working girl’s uniform?  But look at this dress.

White satin dress.

A beautiful white satin dress.   After 100 years it is still beautiful.   This is the largest room.

Larger room for Diamond Lil

Diamond Lil conducted her business here.   Diamond Lil was born in 1881 in Butte, Montana.   She only entertained obviously rich clients who could pay handsomely for what she offered.   She also had three requirements for her clients.   First they had to have a clean bill of health from a doctor.   Second, they had to show financial ability to pay.   Third, and perhaps the most unusual, they had to provide a reference.   A reference???   Diamond Lil stood about 6 feet tall and had a diamond in her front tooth.   This photo of Diamond Lil was displayed at the Red Onion.

Diamond Lil Davenport

Perhaps she is not today’s vision of a sex goddess, but she was very much in demand during the gold rush days in Skagway.   Diamond Lil died June, 1975 in Yakima, Washington at the age of 93.   Leaving the Red Onion, we headed toward the train station, and saw this on the way.

Plow for train

A train engine and this huge snow plow.   The mountains between Skagway and Whitehorse receive several feet of snow every winter, so clearing the train tracks is a necessity.

Plowing ahead

This sign explains a little of the plowing process and the amount of snow to be removed.   The White Pass and Yukon Route train station in Skagway is still in use.

Train Station

The train no longer travels between Skagway and Whitehorse, but shorter rides are available for tourists.

Train for today’s tourists

We rode this tourist train about 20 years ago, when we cruised the Inside Passage of Alaska.  It is fun and interesting, but Chloe was not welcomed on the train, so we didn’t ride it again.   However, if you are in Skagway, we think you would enjoy this train.   Skagway was developed as a mining town, so we admired these hopeful prospectors.

Hoping to get rich

This was a hard life, but many dreamed of riches and tried gold mining.

Prospector and his dog

This prospector and his dog seemed to stop for a rest.   Back to main street, even the tourist shops reflect the importance of the train.

Train is important in Skagway’s history

And we enjoyed shopping in the many jewelry and gift shops.   We did bring some items home also.   Skagway is a great town.   We hope you visit some time.

Skagway Alaska with Soapy Smith and the Colorado Traveling Ducks

Walking along the main street in Skagway, Alaska, look what we saw.

Girls in the window

These girls in the window.   No, they are not going to jump.   They are inviting all to come inside to see the show.

Days of ’98 Show

The Days of ’98 Show is the longest running musical in Alaska.  Mom, what is this all about, and why is Soapy Smith featured?   Our Soapy?  One of the Colorado Traveling Ducks is named Soapy Smith Duck.   Our duck was named after the notorious and clever outlaw, Jefferson Randolph Smith.   Jefferson Smith earned his nickname, “Soapy” while in Colorado.   The human Soapy moved around and eventually settled in Skagway, Alaska.   Let’s go inside and see the show.

Dancing in the saloon

The girls from the window are dancing, showing ruffles and garters.   Let’s check them out now.

Saloon girls on the bar

On the bar?   Mom, this is crazy and fun.   We like it.   The human Soapy Smith owned and managed this bar in Skagway.   He was well liked, but a little on the wrong side of the law most of the time.

Saloon girls with Brad

This is Brad.   He was a chosen volunteer from the audience.   Brad was very gracious about this, and even let the girls get him in different clothes.   The saloon girls are fighting for Brad’s attention.

Soapy Smith with girl on the bar

This is the human Jefferson “Soapy” Smith with a saloon girl.   The entire musical was about Soapy’s life in Skagway, and also his demise.

The talented cast

Our very talented cast was wonderful and we all appreciated them very much.   This was a very enjoyable performance.   When you are in Skagway, we recommend that you see The Days of ’98 Show.    Now back outside.

Grizzly’s General Store

Downtown Skagway still feels like an old mining town.   The wild Alaska feeling is everywhere.   Even Grizzly’s General Store.

Skagway Brewing

And the necessary Skagway Brewing Company.   The history is preserved.

Alaska Geographic National Historical Park

The Alaska Geographic National Historical Park, highlighting the Klondike Gold Rush.

About the gold seekers

You can walk where gold seekers walked.

Skagway’s main street during the gold rush days

But I’m not sure I want to live like gold seekers lived.   People rushed to Skagway on their way to the gold fields.   The population of the town really grew, and quickly.  This is a great town to visit.

Skagway Welcomes the Colorado Traveling Ducks

We arrived in Skagway, Alaska.   That means we once again left the Canadian Yukon and went through US Customs to get to Skagway.   As we stopped at US Customs, our guide book said we should see a glacier in the mountains above the Customs building.   But there was so much snow on the mountain that our moms could not distinguish the glacier from the snow.   We were happy to arrive at the port city of Skagway.

Welcome sign

Our first stop was the Westmark Hotel.

Mural on side of Westmark Hotel.  Ducks on the sidewalk.

This mural for the Westmark caught our attention.   Skagway became famous during the gold rush in the late 1890’s.  The Skagway Westmark will be our home for the next few days.   Wandering around town, we stopped at the Visitor’s Center.

Visitor’s Center. Former Arctic Brotherhood Hall

This is the former Arctic Brotherhood Hall.   The outside facade has more than 8,833 pieces of driftwood sticks arranged in a mosaic pattern.   Included are the Brotherhood’s AB letters and symbols, a gold pan with nuggets.   The entrance shows the year it was first used by the Arctic Brotherhood.

Visitor’s Center historic entrance

These buildings are really old.   That could be because Skagway is the oldest incorporated city in Alaska.   It was incorporated in 1900.   Skagway is a year-round port and one of two gateway cities to the Alaska Highway in Southeast Alaska.   The other is Haines, Alaska.   Inside the Visitor’s Center, we were greeted by friendly, informative people.   You can really see the driftwood sticks on the counter here.

Counter insider Visitor’s Center

We got helpful information here and loved this building.   Nearby we stopped at the Remedy Shoppe.

Remedy Shoppe. Alaska’s first legal marijuana store

Alaska voted to legalize marijuana a couple years ago.   The remedy Shoppe was Alaska’s first legal marijuana store.  We did not purchase anything there.   We ducks and humans do not need or use marijuana.   Our home state of Colorado was one of the first states to legalize marijuana.   Isn’t this trolley great?

Skagway trolley

We love trolleys.   But wait.   What is this?

Skagway Chamber of Commerce sells duck race tickets

The Skagway Chamber of Commerce is selling tickets to the Duck Derby.   We have so many relatives here.

Duck Derby or Duck Races coming soon

We have duck races at home, but we didn’t expect to see them so far north.   Hi to our distant cousins.   The City of Skagway has an interesting museum.

City of Skagway Museum

This museum is just a block from main street.   Very convenient.   Looking down main street, you may notice that these old historic buildings are all constructed from wood.

Historic old buildings in Skagway. All wood construction

That could be a disaster if a fire started.

Public ashtrays to protect historic wooden buildings.

The city is doing its best to prevent fires.   Please put all cigarette and cigar ashes here.   Let’s all do our part to keep Skagway safe and historic.   You may notice some photos show sun and dry streets and other rain and wet streets.   We were only there a few days in May, but we experienced rainy mornings and sunny afternoons and evenings.   So if you are there, remember the weather can change.