British Columbia’s Alaska Highway with Colorado Traveling Ducks

We may be in a different Canadian province, but the scenery is every bit as beautiful.   Perhaps more trees and vegetation.   And this.

Bison near forest

A small herd of bison.   Road signs said to watch for bison, and here they are.   And that forest is beautiful also.   This mom bison wanted to move a little further on the grass, but baby said no.

Baby is hungry

And they did not go until baby said it was time to move.   Really no difference in behavior between human babies and bison babies.   Babies, so small, but seem to be in charge of many things.  Continuing we come to this magnificent bridge.

Lower Liard River Bridge

This is Lower Liard River Bridge.   It is 24.65 meters (94 ft) tall and 307 meters (1143 feet) long.   Built in 1943 this is the only suspension bridge on the Alaska Highway.  Soon we see sheep.

Stone Sheep

Milepost, the Alaska Travel Planner, says we are probably seeing Stone Sheep.  This group is busy licking the ground for necessary minerals.   But this one is watching us.

He sees us!

Maybe he likes to watch traveling ducks as much as we like to watch Stone Sheep.  Here is Northern Rockies Lodge.

Northern Rockies Lodge

This lodge is located on the shores of beautiful Muncho Lake.

Lodge on beautiful Muncho Lake

If we are ever back here, we all want to stay at this lodge.   And for a couple days.   Look at this.

Float plane on Muncho Lake

The float planes can take us out for a one day fishing trip.   Or a sightseeing flight over this area.   There are smaller boats here also.   We saw some tourists on jet skis.   Aren’t these cabins wonderful?

Cabins at lodge

We would love to stay in one.   But we didn’t know about this lodge and we didn’t know when we would be here.   Maybe another time?  Here is our bear for today.

Our last bear

When we saw him, we didn’t know that this would be our last bear sighting on this trip.  Maybe he did.   He seems to be walking away from us.   One last scenic view for this post.

View of Sawthooth Mountains

This is a view of the Sawtooth Mountains.  Being from Colorado, we have beautiful mountains and gorgeous scenery.   The difference here is a lack of humans.   We can stop and watch whatever we want, and there are no other tourists here.   There is very little traffic on the Alaska Highway now.   Perhaps later in the summer it will be more traveled, but now it is just perfect for us.   We hope you take the time to discover this beautiful, uncrowded part of our world.

Advertisements

Watson Lake. Colorado Traveling Ducks Visit Sign Post City

We are in Watson Lake.   This will be our last community in the Yukon Territory.   But what a community!  Driving into the community of Watson Lake, we see something unusual.

Are those sign posts?

Are these sign posts?   Oh yes.   Not just a few signs, but so many.

Sign Post Forest, Watson Lake

This is Watson Lake’s most famous attraction.

Sign Post Forest of Watson Lake

We are at the Sign Post Forest.   OK, but why are all these signposts here?

How did this start?

This sign explains the beginning.   Just think, all these signs are the result of a homesick American from Danville, Illinois.   Apparently he was not the only one suffering from a little homesickness.

Sign Post Forest, Watson Lake

Look at all these signs.   The Alaska Highway was started March 8, 1942.   More than 11,000 soldiers and engineers, 16,000 civilians and 7,000 pieces of equipment built this 1,500 mile road through the vast wilderness of northern Canada and Alaska.   In less than 9 months Dawson Creek, British Columbia and Delta Junction, Alaska were connected.    What an accomplishment.   Once Carl Lindley put up the first sign, the idea really caught on and everyone started putting up signs.

Sign Post Forest, Watson Lake

Even with these panoramas, there was no way mom could get photos to show the thousands of signs, everywhere.   We ducks enjoyed sitting on the bridge and reading some signs.

A bridge in Sign Post Forest, Watson Lake

We went to the Visitor’s Center in Sign Post Forest.   They were very helpful and so nice.   If humans have a sign to add to the forest, the Visitor’s Center will provide a hammer and guide humans to the area where new signs can be placed.   Our moms said if we ever come here again, we will bring a sign to add.

Sign Post Forest, Watson Lake

Leaving the Visitor’s Center, we looked more and are still rather speechless at all the signs.   Our guide book says Sign Post Forest is one of The Yukon’s most famous landmarks and contains over 72,000 unique signs.  Looking down the main street (The Alaska Highway), we liked the international flags.

Main Street, Watson Lake

As you can see, Watson Lake is not a large town.

Main Street, Watson Lake

According to Wikipedia, the 2016 census showed a population of 790 permanent residents.   Our hotel was clean and comfortable.   The restaurant served great food.   If you are looking for an interesting place to get away from it all, you might like Watson Lake, Yukon Territory, Canada.   Heading south in the morning, we once again saw an adorable bear along the road.   Of all the bear photos mom took, this just might be her favorite.

Favorite bear photo. Is he watching us?

Isn’t he looking right back at us as we look at and admire him.   We were thrilled to see bears along the road in the Yukon almost every day.   Continuing through the beautiful scenery, we left the Yukon Territory and entered beautiful British Columbia.

Leaving Yukon Territory and entering British Columbia

We are enjoying our scenic drive through Canada.

Teslin Tlingit Heritage Center with Colorado Traveling Ducks

Here in the Canadian Yukon Territory, we discovered a Heritage Center and it is located on beautiful Teslin Lake.   The Yukon is beautiful!   Let’s stop and explore the Teslin Tlingit Heritage Center.

Teslin Tlingit Heritage Centre

It was cool and cloudy, so the walk to the entrance is rather dark.

Walkway to enter Heritage Center

But we loved these totem poles.

Totem Pole

If you have visited southeast Alaska, you may have seen some items from the Tlingit Indians.   There are many totem poles in Ketchikan, Alaska and other Alaskan towns.   Entering the Heritage Center, we stopped to look in the gift shop.   They have many beautifully made items, but we wanted to see the exhibits here.

Great masks

These masks are fantastic.   Remembering that -40 temperatures are common, we really liked the furs.

Such beautiful work. Love the boots

We would love those boots in our Colorado mountains.   Of course, other items are also needed.

All made carefully by hand

Things must be hand made.   No nearby shopping mall.   There were so many fascinating exhibits and we hope you visit here.   But the setting of the Heritage Center is breath taking.

Picnic anyone?

From the back of the center, you can access the lake and enjoy a picnic.   Or just sit and admire the view.   The view from the side is equally beautiful.

Another picnic area by Teslin Lake

And the building has beautiful large windows for year around viewing.   We love these canoes.

Canoes

Aren’t they large and attractive?   Too bad no canoe rides for us today.   So many picnic tables and areas here.

So many picnic areas

This is perfect and so many people can enjoy the lake and the beautiful Yukon views.   Ducks and humans are so in awe of the beauty of nature here in the Yukon.   A few miles south of Teslin Tlingit Heritage Center is Nisutlin Trading Post and Motel.

Police car. Officer looks so real

Of course, we, like most drivers on the Alaska Highway, stop for gas at every gas station.   You never know if the next one is open or if it has gas.   This police car is great and the officer looks so real from the road.   No speeding here.   We loved our time outside today, but our favorite Canadian was enjoying a snack along the road.

Happily eating

We saw a bear about every day and we always pulled over to watch them eat and admire them.   This drive is beautiful.   And both relaxing and invigorating with the incredible Yukon scenery.

Enjoying the Alaska Highway in the Canadian Yukon

On the road again.   We are on vacation, so there are no alarm clocks and no early morning rush to leave.   Shortly after leaving Beaver Creek, Yukon Territory, we saw one of the stars of our trip.

Bear along the road

This bear was walking along the side of our road.   Our moms said he is a rock star.   He knew we were there, of course, but he did not look at us.   We stopped the Jeep and watched him walk at a steady pace, completely ignoring us.   He would get pretty far ahead of us, we would drive to him, and never an acknowledgement.   We just loved him.   Later, this rest area caught our attention.   This is Kluane River View point.

So pretty

Stop to admire the river was so necessary.   Also at this stop, there was a sign about caribou.   Caribou are similar to reindeer, but these were some facts we did not know.   Be sure to read the last sentence.

Sign says it better than mom

Moving tendons make that much noise???  Amazing.   Lake Kluane also made us stop.

Kluane Lake

This road trip is about seeing unspoiled nature, with very few other humans around.   So we stopped often.   Later, a small building with a nearby huge Canadian flag waving in the breeze.

Canadian flag

Of course entering the building was another must do for us.

Tachal Dhal Visitor’s Center

This is Tachal Dhal, or Sheep Mountain.   Again, the sign says it best.

Sheep Mountain

We love to watch Dall Sheep, but it was not to happen today.   The lady at the center, said it was getting warm enough (but still need jackets for humans) that the sheep moved to the other, higher, mountains.   We looked.

Sheep Mountain

Nice mountain, but no sheep here today.   Did you notice that the sign is written in English and in French.   That was the normal for most signs we saw in Canada.   Driving through unspoiled scenery with very few other cars is peaceful and beautiful.   But, you can guess, this was one of the most welcome sights along the road.

Always a welcome sight

And all were very clean and well maintained.   Thanks Yukon Territory!

Wildlife Sanctuary in Colorado

Lions and tigers and bears, oh yes.  Sunday we all went to the Wildlife Sanctuary in Keenesburg, Colorado.  It was wonderful.  We saw so many wild animals and none of them in small cages.  It was great—and safe.

Wildlife Sanctuary with JB Duck, Soapy Duck and Zeb Duck

Wildlife Sanctuary with JB Duck, Soapy Duck and Zeb Duck

This wildlife sanctuary provides homes and care for rescued wild animals.  They seem to have mostly lions, tigers,

Lounging Tiger

Lounging Tiger

bears, and wolfs.

Wolf at rest

Wolf at rest

But we also saw a camel and several llamas.

After arriving and paying the admission fee, we paid $15 per adult; we walked on the elevated walkway.  The walkway is about a mile long.  We looked down on the animals.  The animals have areas of several acres to roam.  With people above them the animals are not afraid, nor were we.  The animal areas have balls, water areas, structures the animals may climb and tunnels in the ground.

These animals have all been rescued from abusive situations.

Bear happy at home

Bear happy at home

The animals have never lived in the wild and they never will.  These formerly caged animals do not have the survival instincts of the wild animals.  This is their final home.

Tiger enjoying a meal

Tiger enjoying a meal

The Wildlife Sanctuary is a great place to visit and learn how the animals live and play.

This lion was one of 25 rescued from Bolivian zoos.  He is inside, but his door is open.  Shortly after this photo he went outside again.  Freedom he never knew before coming to the Wildlife Sanctuary.

Lion rescued from Bolivia.  Is he talking to us??

Lion rescued from Bolivia. Is he talking to us??

We three Colorado Traveling Ducks thought it was great and we believe that you will enjoy visiting here.  Please visit www.wildanimalsanctuary.org   To learn about this Wildlife Sanctuary and see the amazing photos and stories available.

We 3 ducks hope to see you here soon.

We 3 ducks hope to see you here soon.

This is a wonderful place for people and for animals that had been without hope before being rescued.  Please visit and tell all your friends.