Skagway back to Whitehorse with the Colorado Traveling Ducks

Skagway was a lot of fun.   The South Klondike Highway takes us from Skagway, back to Canada, onto the Alaska Highway and into Whitehorse.   Our last look at Skagway is beautiful.

Skagway with cruise ship

A cruise ship is in port today and the sky is cloudy, adding a sense of adventure and uncertainty.

Birds gliding over Tiaya Inlet

Further along the Tiaya Inlet, the birds fly over the water toward the mountains.   Leaving Alaska, clearing Canadian customs, we stop at Goat Lake Hydroelectric Project.

Goat Lake Hydroelectric Project

Goat Lake is high in the mountains.   Much of Pitch Fork Falls is clear of ice.

Pitchfork Falls

We love waterfalls.   The mountain scenery is beautiful.   Such a large attraction for this drive.   Passing through Carcross, passing the Carcross Desert, we had to make another stop at Emerald Lake.

Emerald Lake

We love the colors of the lake.   It seems that we are back in bear country.

Black bear

This black bear is in no hurry as he grazes by the road.   Something white is moving on the side of the mountain.

Dall sheep

Dall sheep are common in this area.   This one has been jumping around eating any available vegetation.   A sudden start from this sheep, and a few rocks slide down the mountain onto the road.   Our mini rockslide.   But enough to get us to move on.   But more animals.

Two grizzlies

Another mom and cub grizzly bear.   We certainly are enjoying seeing the bears and other animals.   The mountain scenery along this road is spectacular.

Love the rugged, snowy mountains

We were not planning on a side trip to Skagway, but we are so glad we went.   Skagway is fun, but this drive is outstanding.   And no traffic.   We hope you see this area for yourself.   It is beautiful.

Beaver Creek to Kluane Lake, Yukon with Colorado Traveling Ducks

This was a great traveling day.   We didn’t travel several hundred miles, but we saw animals and a huge gold pan.   Leaving Beaver Creek, the most western Canadian community, our first stop was to see the world’s largest gold pan.

World’s largest gold pan

Here we are in Burwash Landing, Canadian Yukon.   This gold pan is 21 feet in diameter and features a gold miner panning for gold.   The picture of the gold miner is painted occasionally.   The last time was about 10 years ago.   It could use a new painting.   We  saw the Kluane Museum of History; not open while we were there.

Kluane Museum of History

Outside we enjoyed a great display of life after fires.   After fires, small plants and trees begin to emerge, attracting insects and small animals.   Then larger vegetation and larger animals.   The circle of life is regenerated after forest fires.

Outdoor museum

Also there is the outdoor exhibits of original buildings.   Burwash Landing was the traditional home of Southern Tutchona Athabascan Indians and was their summer camp.   In the early 1900’s, a trading post was established here by the Jacquot brothers.   Of course, for a short time gold mining was a major source of income.   We enjoyed the statues around the museum area.

Working on tractor

The tractor was rather surprising, but we liked it.   Food must be grown everywhere.   Burwash Landing, according to the 2011 census, has a population of 90 permanent residents.

Lake Kluane

Located on the southern shores of Kluane Lake, Burwash Landing is the administration center of the Kluane First Nation people.   Continuing down the Alaska Highway, we were happy to see this grizzly bear.

One grizzly bear

Isn’t she wonderful?  But wait.

Three grizzlies.   And motorcycle

Not one grizzly, but three.   Mom and her two cubs.   They stopped to roll and play in the road.   Then to the lake.

Mom and cubs heading to Kluane Lake. Bath time

After crossing the road, they approached Kluane Lake.   Here they will bathe and have a short swim in the cold Kluane Lake.

Kluane Lake

The few other vehicles that were on the road also stopped to watch this fabulous grizzly bear family.   Continuing south on the Alaska Highway, we soon reached Thachal Dhal Visitor’s Center.

Thachal Dhal Visitor’s Center

Unfortunately the Visitor’s Center had not yet opened for the season.   Most places on the Alaska Highway open in mid or late  May.   But there are enough motels, campgrounds and restaurants that are open year round that travelers can be comfortable any time.   Winter in the far north is the determining factor for most tourists, and when they want to travel.  Last year we stopped at the Thachal Dhal Visitor’s Center.   It is very interesting and definitely worth a stop.   It is a great place to see the Dall Sheep, during spring and fall.

Dall Sheep on mountain side

We did see some Dall Sheep on the mountain side.   They are fun to watch as they run and jump around the rocky mountain areas.   Also on our drive, we saw three caribou or reindeer playing in the woods by the road, and a moose in a lake, too far away for a photo.   We love seeing all the animals, the lakes, snow capped mountains and very little traffic.   We hope you drive the Alaska or Alcan Highway in late May or early June.   It is beautiful.