The High and Low of Death Valley with Zeb, Soapy Smith and JB Duck

The largest national park south of Alaska reveals more secrets to the Colorado Traveling Ducks.  Driving to Dantes View, we gain elevation.   This, the most breathtaking viewpoint in the park, is 5,475 feet above the floor of Death Valley.   Looking to the floor of Death Valley from Dantes View, the green vegetation is a contrast to the dry earth.

From Dantes View

From Dantes View

The white ground below is a reminder that all minerals that are thrown in the valley, from volcanic activity, earthquakes or rain, will forever remain in Death Valley.   This land, below sea level, has no outlet to the sea, so everything stays here and is further altered by the forces of nature.

From Dantes View

From Dantes View

Not only is the floor of Death Valley covered with minerals, but the mountain walls of the valley exhibit colors and patterns from thousands of years of change.

From Dantes View

From Dantes View

Mom is experimenting with the panorama function on her camera.

Floor of Death Valley from Dantes View

Floor of Death Valley from Dantes View

We like the effect.   From the high point, let’s go to the floor of Death Valley.   We drive to Badwater Basin.

Badwater Basin

Badwater Basin

This is not only the lowest point in North America, but it is the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere.   There are not many places in the world where you can stand on dry land, below sea level.    Let’s go on the salt flats.

On the salt flats

On the salt flats

We are careful to only walk where it is allowed.   This environment is fragile and we do not want to destroy any of it.   We are happy to discover our national parks.   Did you know that the National Park Service is 100 years old in 2016?   Now we turn our backs to the salt flats and look at the rock wall.

Standing 282 feet below sea level

Standing 282 feet below sea level

If you look closely you will see a white rectangular sign marking sea level.   The sign is about half way up the wall and 2/3 to the right of this photo.   The information signs say that Death Valley Basin is still dropping.   Today we are 282 feet below sea level.   Hundreds of years from now, these salt flats probably will be further below sea level.     We only spent a couple days in Death Valley National Park, but you could spend a day, a week, or months here and never see everything.   The park is huge and the land is constantly changing.   The rain and flooding from September gave us the wildflowers this spring.   In the park, you can receive wildflower updates.   You may want to view the best flower display.   We loved all the flowers, but our photos are not the best.   You may want to use google to see more pictures.   But we were happy with these flowers.

A few wildflowers by the road

A few wildflowers by the road

We hope you enjoy some national parks this year.

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2 thoughts on “The High and Low of Death Valley with Zeb, Soapy Smith and JB Duck

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