Chatanika Lodge and Alaska Pipeline

We have a new realtor to sell the house in North Pole.   Most of the other business is finished.   Now we get to be tourists.   From Fairbanks we drive north toward Fox.   This is a great place to see the Alaska Pipeline, and maybe even touch it.   This sign tells about the pipeline.

Route of the Alaska Pipeline

As you can see, it is 800 miles long, transporting crude oil from Prudhoe Bay on the Arctic Ocean to Valdez Marine Terminal, eventally shipped from the Pacific Ocean to ports around the world.  I, Zeb the Duck, and mom have been here before, and so has Alaska native, Eider Duck.   This is the first time for Soapy Smith Duck, his mom and his dog, Chloe.

Soapy’s mom and dog, Chloe, and the Colorado Traveling Ducks under the pipeline.

Chloe and mom are under the pipeline, with we ducks.  The pipeline is tall enough for a large Alaskan moose to easily walk under it.   The moose and other large animals migrate through parts of Alaska that now have a pipeline.  Some times the pipeline is above ground and sometimes the pipeline is below ground.

Sometimes pipeline is underground

There were no other tourists here, so Chloe had a great time running and frolicking along the pipeline.

Chloe running along pipeline

The pipeline carries hot oil, about 100 degrees F at this location.   To keep the pipeline clean, pigs are put inside the pipe.

Old and newer pigs to clean inside the AlaskaPipeline.

At first they needed to scrape wax from the pipe.   Now there is less wax but they smooth the flow by reducing turbulence inside the pipeline.   The pipeline averages 1.5 million barrels of oil daily.   The entire trip for a barrel of oil takes 11.9 days, starting at Prudhoe Bay and ending in Valdez.   We drive to Chatanika Lodge.

Chatanika Lodge

This is a great place.   There are rooms to spend a few nights, a good restaurant and bar.   Ron and Shirley, the owners, also have great Alaskan decor with an additional room featuring an old classic car and an older Harley.

Vintage car and Harley

Ron and Shirley host great parties here.

One of the many parties held here

Eider and his dad came here for New Year’s Eve parties and for Chatanika Days, the first weekend in March.   Celebrating longer days and the promise of a warmer spring and summer is important.   Also popular is the Halloween party.   Eider’s dad loved this lodge and the great parties.   Everyone has fun here.   Eider’s dad was also a sportsman, so when he passed away, we asked Ron and Shirley to display some hunting and fishing trophies.   Here is his salmon.

Eider’s dad’s salmon

This buffalo or bison head was the result of a Colorado hunting trip.

Eider’s buffalo head

And our favorite.

Eider’s bear

This is an Alaska bear.   This bear stood in the living room of his house in North Pole, Alaska.   Soapy’s mom likes the bear.

Eider’s bear and Soapy’s mom

These mounts are enjoying the parties at Chatanika now.

Ron. Owner of Chatanika Lodge and our friend

Thanks for taking care of them Ron and Shirley.

 

Moose Hunting in Alaska with Eider Duck

My Alaska cousin, Eider Duck, went moose hunting.   He sent us these photos.   Eider and his humans drove north on the Dalton Highway.

Eider Duck on the Dalton Highway

Eider Duck on the Dalton Highway

These are his human hunters.

Ready to start the hunting trip

Ready to start the hunting trip

They camped in tents in northern Alaska for two weeks in September.

Eider, take care of the humans.

Eider, take care of the humans.

Hunting in northern Alaska requires a variety of vehicles.

These hunting vehicles came here on trailers behind their trucks

These hunting vehicles came here on trailers behind their trucks

This is a sample of the area they visited.

Careful Eider.   Don't get lost out there.

Careful Eider. Don’t get lost out there.

Some of their traveling was near the famous Alaska pipeline.   The pipeline here doesn’t look very far from the ground, but it is.

Passing the Alaska pipeline

Passing the Alaska pipeline

Eider told me the pipe must me far enough off the ground for herds of caribou and moose to easily pass under the pipeline.   Eider and his humans are heading down this road.

Northern Alaska in September with Eider Duck

Northern Alaska in September with Eider Duck

Eider said he had fun on the hunting trip, but the humans did not see even one moose.  The moose also know when it is hunting season.   Eider is back home now and ready to go to the grocery store with his humans.  The rule of his human hunters:  If you shoot it you must eat it.  They did not shoot any moose, so there is nothing to eat.   A trip to the grocery store will fill the refrigerator this season.

Eider will going to the grocery store soon.

Eider will going to the grocery store soon.

Thanks for the photos Eider.  And thanks for telling me about your camping and hunting in northern Alaska last September.