Zeb and Eider Continue Touring Australia’s Great Ocean Road

Zeb and Eider Duck and the humans loved this view from our hotel, Beacon Point Ocean View Villas near Apollo Bay, Victoria, Australia.

First view of the day

First view of the day

Just before we left, we admired this rainbow.

Morning rainbow

Morning rainbow

Isn’t that a great sight first thing in the morning?   Driving to the Great Ocean Road, Fabian spotted this koala.

Koala. This is not his face

Koala. This is not his face

He is sleeping with his back toward us.   Walking at the marina at Apollo Bay,

Going on this pier

Going on this pier

we admired this clear water.

Really clear water here

Really clear water here

We also admired the boats.

Love boats

Love boats

We loved the waves breaking.

Crashing waves are beautiful

Crashing waves are beautiful

Driving on the Great Ocean Road, the views were beautiful.   This was from Cape Patton.

Great coastline from Cape Patton

Great coastline from Cape Patton

At the next stop, the humans fed colorful tropical birds.   Humans were given a handful of bird seed and this King Parrot knew what to do.

Feeding King Parrot

Feeding King Parrot

This Crimson Rosella was also happy to have a snack.

Crimson Rosella also having a snack

Crimson Rosella also having a snack

The Sulphur Crested Cockatoo were eager to get a share also.

Sulphur Crested Cockatoos want some also

Sulphur Crested Cockatoos want some also

This King Parrot found a new place to sit.

Found a new place to sit while eating

Found a new place to sit while eating

Along The Great Ocean Road, we saw many of these Sulphur Crested Cockatoos.   We love them, but not everyone is a fan of these beautiful birds.

Sulphur Crested Cockatoos are plentiful. Considered exotic birds in US and farmers pest here.

Sulphur Crested Cockatoos are plentiful.   Considered exotic birds in US and farmers pest here.

They have very strong beaks and cause much damage in a farmer’s field.     Along the Great Ocean Road, we stopped at Memorial Arch.

Memorial Arch

Memorial Arch

The Great Ocean Road was begun in 1918 with 3,000 workers, many returning veterans from World War I, and the project was completed in 1932.  The road was built with axes and picks; no explosives were used.   This statue commemorates the men that built The Great Ocean Road.

Commemorating men who built The Great Ocean Road

Commemorating men who built The Great Ocean Road

Our last stop of the day was the Anglesea Golf Course where we were greeted y this kangaroo.

Is he saying welcome to our golf course?

Is he saying welcome to our golf course?

Several kangaroos were grazing on the edge of the fairways, but this young kangaroo wasn’t interested in grazing.

Mom is still the best!

Mom is still the best!

Mom is still the favorite.   We really enjoyed our tour with Australian Natural Treasures Touring, and the Great Ocean Road is breathtaking.   Visit them at http://www.anttouring.com.au   Thanks Glenn and Jeremy.

Rainforest Walk in Australia’s Great Otway National Park with Zeb and Eider

Temperate Rainforest in Great Otway National Park is visited by Zeb and Eider Duck.   We stopped at Maits Rest to experience the 800 meter rainforest walk.

Let's walk

Let’s walk

The trees are tall and the path is clear.

Boardwalk through rainforest

Boardwalk through rainforest

The trunk on this tree is huge!

Huge tree trunk

Huge tree trunk

Great Otway National Park consists of 103,185 hectares and is located 162 km southwest of Melbourne.  There is prolific plant growth throughout the dense rain forest.

Dense ferns

Dense ferns

The trees and tropical ferns are beautiful and create a peaceful environment.

Boardwalk

Boardwalk

Even fallen tree trunks are huge.

Inside the tree trunk

Inside the tree trunk

The Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) grow over 100 meters, making them the tallest flowering plants in the world.

Story of Mountain Ash

Story of Mountain Ash

The rare carnivorous, Otway Black Snail, is found only in the Otways where it feeds on insects and other snails and worms.

Otway Black Snail

Otway Black Snail

We did not see a real Otway Black Snail, but maybe that was a good thing.   We really loved our time in this temperate rainforest.

Otway Temperate Rainforest

Otway Temperate Rainforest

Wow!   This tree trunk is huge.   Fabian can stand inside the tree!

Trunk large enough for Fabian to stand inside

Trunk large enough for Fabian to stand inside

Even the road leading out of Maits Rest was pretty.

Leaving the rainforest

Leaving the rainforest

We hope you visit a rainforest.   They are fascinating.

Zeb and Eider Tour Victoria, Australia’s Great Ocean Road

Zeb and Eider and the humans spent the night in Mount Gambier.   This is Blue Lake, a dormant volcano.

Blue Lake at Mount Gambier

Blue Lake at Mount Gambier

It is the water supply for Mount Gambier.   And it is a very pretty lake.   Shortly after crossing into Victoria, we admired this emu.

First emu sighting after crossing into the state of Victoria

First emu sighting after crossing into the state of Victoria

Of course, the kangaroos are always a favorite with humans.

Kangaroos

Kangaroos

Logan’s Beach seems to be a whale nursery.   We did see a Southern Right Whale in the distance, with her young.

Southern Right Whale and baby swimming far in distance

Southern Right Whale and baby swimming far in distance

She was too far away for a good photo.   We are in Nullawarre and we are going on the Great Ocean Road.

Colorado Traveling Ducks go to The Great Ocean Road

Colorado Traveling Ducks go to The Great Ocean Road

This is Bay of Martyrs.

Martyr's Bay

Bay of Martyrs

Here we are at Shipwreck Coast.

Shipwreck Coast

Shipwreck Coast

Shipwwreck Coast is about 130 km and has 638 known shipwrecks.   About 240 of these wrecks have been discovered.   A very treacherous coastline.   This is Australia’s London Bridge.

London Bridge on Great Ocean Road

London Bridge on Great Ocean Road

There used to be a natural bridge connecting these two stone formations.

London Bridge

London Bridge

In January 1990 it collapsed.   No one was injured and no one was on the bridge when it collapsed.   However, some people were stranded on the island created when the bridge collapsed.   They had to be returned to the main side by helicopter.    There is a colony of little (or fairy) penguins that live here.

Area for Little Penguins

Area for Little Penguins

They fish and feed during the day.  They come in at dusk.   To protect them there are no stairs to the beach.   The little penguins need to be protected.   They grow to be about a foot or less in height.    The humans saw them at another location in Australia about 10 years ago.   They just love the little penguins.   Stopping at Port Campbell, mom loved this seagull with her lipstick matching her shoes.

Lady has matching lipstick and shoes

Lady has matching lipstick and shoes

Next stop was the Twelve Apostles National Park.

Twelve Apostles National Park at Port Campbell

Twelve Apostles National Park at Port Campbell

Beautiful!   But 12??   Not any more, if ever.   These limestone formations have been eroded and worn away by the strong ocean currents.

12 Apostles along Great Ocean Road

12 Apostles along Great Ocean Road

Following the boardwalk to the left, these two additional sculptures, or apostles, are visible.

Take path by 12 Apostles, to the end

Take path by 12 Apostles, to the end

Further down the path, we saw this structure attached to a main rock.

Naturally formed

Naturally formed

This is a great road.   We loved the ocean on one side, while the farm and pasture land on the other side is also beautiful.   This flock of sheep captured mom’s attention.

Sheep grazing along Great Ocean Road

Sheep grazing along Great Ocean Road

We are still on our tour, so keep reading our blog to see what we experience next.   When in Victoria, Australia, don’t miss the Great Ocean Road.

Naracoorte Caves National Park in Australia with Zeb and Eider Duck

Zeb and Eider Duck and the humans visited a World Heritage Site.

Naracoorte Caves National Park

Naracoorte Caves National Park

We entered the Naracoorte Caves.

Going into cave

Going into cave

There are many stalactites and stalagmites.

Inside cave

Inside cave

Stalactites come from the roof and stalagmites come from the floor.   They are created from dripping water, entering through openings in the ceiling.

Inside cave

Inside cave

There are many smaller cave areas within the cave system.

Inside cave

Inside cave

A flashlight placed on a thin shelf of the cave causes a glow in the rock.

Flashlight on thin shelf

Flashlight on thin shelf

More recently another part of the cave system was found and it contains great fossils.   This is believed to be an ancestor of today’s kangaroo.

Fossil inside cave

Fossil inside cave

Some people believe this was an ancestor of today’s wombat.

Fossil inside cave

Fossil inside cave

In the area of the caves, we saw The Australian Fossil Mammal Site.   The Wonambi Fossil Center shows how the caves acted a pitfall traps, dens and roost for more than 500,000 years leading to a vast accumulation of skeletal remains of reptiles, birds and mammals.

Wonambi Fossil Center

Wonambi Fossil Center

So far, about 130 species of animals have been recorded here.    Entering the Wonambi Fossil Center, we were greeted by this, now extinct, Tasmanian Tiger.

Tasmanian Tiger--extinct

Tasmanian Tiger–extinct

It is so sad that he is extinct.   We love tigers.   They are some of our favorite animals at any zoo.    We liked this display also.

Extinct

Extinct

Another great display.

Display in Wonambi Fossil Center

Display in Wonambi Fossil Center

 

This one is very large.   Scientists believe he evolved into much smaller animals today.

So big!

So big!

We love going into caves and seeing these fossils.   We hope  you visit these or any other caves soon.   But, beware.   Humans like these caves, and so do bats.

We like caves

We like caves

Zeb and Eider Duck Begin Bus Tour from Adelaide to Melbourne, Australia

Zeb and Eider Duck and the humans are going on a multi day bus tour.   Our guide and driver, Glenn, picked us up in Adelaide and will drive us through the wine country, along the Great Ocean Road and into Melbourne.   Leaving Adelaide, the scenery look like we are leaving Denver and heading to the mountains.   But, soon we were in green, hilly, pasture land.

Hilly pasture land east of Adelaide

Hilly pasture land east of Adelaide

Passing through small villages we admired old buildings such as this church in Keith.

Old church in Keith, Australia

Old church in Keith, Australia

We traveled the Limestone Coast and saw many vineyards.

Vineyards

Vineyards

In the Padthaway Wine Region, we visited Henry’s Drive Vignerons.

Henry's Drive Vignerons

Henry’s Drive Vignerons

As you can see, the humans sampled some wine.

Wine was sampled

Wine was sampled

All agreed it was very good.   This winery was named after the proprietor of a 19th century mail coach service that once ran through this property, Mr. Henry John Hill.   Thus, the symbol on the wine labels.

Label for Henry's Drive

Label for Henry’s Drive

We sampled wine and had lunch here.  They grow their own grapes.

Growing grapes at the vineyard

Growing grapes at the vineyard

and also raise sheep here.

Raising sheep at the vineyard

Raising sheep at the vineyard

Their first vines were planted in 1992.   We liked this winery.   For more information visit http://www.HenrysDrive.com  Further down the coast, we stopped to visit Father Woods Park.

Father Woods Park

Father Woods Park

The wood carving were made with chain saws.   The park honors Mary MacKillop.

Mary MacKillop

Mary MacKillop

Mary is Australia’s first and only saint.   She was honored by the Catholic Church for her work with children.   We liked these carvings.

Wood carvings made with chainsaws

Wood carvings made with chainsaws

We are all enjoying this bus tour.

Coober Pedy and Nearby with Zeb and Eider

We walked around this little town and we have never seen so many opal stores.

One of several small opal shops lining the street in Coober Pedy

One of several small opal shops lining the street in Coober Pedy

We went inside some, but the human already have some opals, and Zeb and Eider don’t think any new opals will be coming home with us.   We liked this car, the Opal Bug, at the Opal Beetle.

Car at Opal Beetle Shop

Opal Bug at Opal Beetle Shop

We entered the Umoona Opal Mine and Museum.

Umoona Mine

Umoona Mine

Into the mine.

Entering the mine

Entering the mine

Through the tunnels.

Walking through mine tunnel

Walking through mine tunnel

A layer of opal still in the rock.

Opal still in rock

Opal still in rock

This opal is great and they had a wonderful gift shop.   But still no opals going home with us.    These rock formations are known as The Breakaways.

The Breakaways

The Breakaways

Look at this sky.  Love the clouds.

The Breakaways

The Breakaways

Nearby is the dingo fence, or the dog fence.

We are at the Dingo Fence

We are at the Dingo Fence

This dingo fence is the longest structure in the world.   It is even longer than the Great Wall of China.   This fence now extends for 5,300 kilometers.     At one time it extended 9,600 kilometers.

Longest structure in the world

Longest structure in the world

The fence was built by ranchers to prevent the wild dingos from the north from killing the stock   The dingo fence was built in 1946.   We then visited the Underground Serbian Orthodox Church of Saint Elijah Parish.

Underground Serbian Orthodox Church

Underground Serbian Orthodox Church

We are entering the tunnel leading to the interior of the church.

Tunnel to underground church

Tunnel to underground church

The altar is beautiful.

Altar of underground Serbian Orthodox Church

Altar of underground Serbian Orthodox Church

This is the view from the church balcony.

From church balcony

From church balcony

The church is built into the mountain, like a cave, so they can have these beautiful windows on one side

Dugout allows one side with beautiful windows

Dugout allows one side with beautiful windows

We really enjoyed our visit to Coober Pedy.   We hope you visit also.

Australia’s Ayers Rock or Uluru and Kata Tjuta with Zeb and Eider Duck

Zeb and Eider and the humans visited Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

We arrived in the afternoon and immediately arranged to view Uluru, previously called Ayers Rock, at sunset.   The rock seems to change color as the sun begins to set.

Uluru as sun begins to set

Uluru as sun begins to set

This is one of our favorite sunset photos.

Uluru at sunset

Uluru at sunset

The next morning we returned to view the sunrise.   The sun is hitting Uluru now, creating light and great shadows.

Sunrise at Uluru

Sunrise at Uluru

The rock is so large that photographs are difficult.   From Uluru, we could see the rising sun reflect on the Kata Tjuta formation.

Sunrise over Kata Tjuta

Sunrise over Kata Tjuta

The entire scene of sunrise and huge rocks is very impressive.   Later we drove around Uluru.   You can see the rock is not smooth.

Not just a smooth rock

Not just a smooth rock

The uneven surface and holes or small caves, make the rock more interesting and mysterious to us.   Many humans walk round the rock,and many climb Uluru.

Some tourists climb Uluru

Some tourists climb Uluru

Climbing Uluru can be dangerous and the native aboriginal people ask you not to climb their sacred sites.   We sat here close to the ground, but we did not climb Uluru.

We did not climb. Just sat at bottom of rock. Aboriginals request no climbing.

We did not climb. Just sat at bottom of rock. Aboriginals request no climbing.

It is very impressive to walk round the area, gazing at the 1,150 feet, or 350 meters of the giant monolith that is above ground.

Uluru. Best appreciated from a distance to see whole thing

Uluru. Best appreciated from a distance to see whole thing

Geologists say that Uluru is the summit of a massive underground chunk of sandstone, about 600 million years old.    About 10% of the rock is visible.   Next we drove 20 miles (32km) west to Kata Tjuta, or the Olgas.   Kata Tjuta is  a cluster of 36 sandstone and arkose (sedimentary rock formed from granite sands).

Kata Tjuta is cluster of several rocks

Kata Tjuta is cluster of 36 sandstone rocks

The largest, Mount Olga, rises 1,800 feet (549 meters) above the ground.

Mount Olga

Mount Olga

Scientists believe Kata Tjuta was part of a giant monolith about 10 times the size of Uluru.   Kata Tjuta has fewer visitors than Uluru and there are no facilities or water available.    Also, no climbing on the rocks is permitted   There are several hikes around the rocks, but visitors must stay on the trails.    The winds were pretty strong when we were there.    This is the trail to the Olga Gorge.

Trail to Olga Gorge

Trail to Olga Gorge

We are getting closer.

Getting higher

Getting higher

It is quite windy now.   People can hike to the gorge, but not climb on the rocks.

Really windy now

Really windy now

We liked Kata Tjuta,

Kata Tjuta

Kata Tjuta

and Uluru.

Uluru

Uluru

When you visit, we think you will really enjoy the park.   We also think you will take hundreds of photos of the rocks.   Our humans did.

Riding The Ghan in Australia with Zeb and Eider Duck

Zeb and Eider Duck are on another train.

Comfortable in our seat with a water bottle

Comfortable in our seat with a water bottle

We had our first long train ride on Australia’s Indian Pacific, and now we are going on another one.   This is the Ghan.   The Indian Pacific travels east and west, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans.   The Ghan travels north and south, connecting Darwin with Adelaide.

The Ghan. Our second Australian train

The Ghan. Our second Australian train

We are getting on the train in Darwin, in Australia’s Northern Territory.   The Ghan is named for the Afghan camel drivers that worked in Australia building the telegraph system.   That is why we have a camel emblem on the side of our train car.   People are still getting on the train.

Many people boarding the Ghan

Many people boarding the Ghan

People are loading our luggage on the train.

The luggage goes on the train. We can only have hand luggage with us.

The luggage goes on the train.   We can only have hand luggage with us.

Larry, the safety manager, said that we have about 36 cars on our train.   We also have train cars with automobiles.   Some people are bringing their personal vehicles with them.   We, of course, retuned our rental car and our personal vehicles are in Colorado and Alaska, so no car for us.   Soon we crossed the Elizabeth River.

Elizabeth River

Elizabeth River

This is one of Australia’s most important rivers.   This is a view as we approach the town of Adelaide River.

Approaching town of Adelaide River

Approaching town of Adelaide River.   Much open space and many trees.

The Ghan stops in Katherine.

Stopping in Katherine

Stopping in Katherine

We stay here for a couple hours.   Eider’s dad took a shuttle into Katherine.   Zeb’s mom took Zeb and Eider into Nitmiluk Park again.   We were here before, but it is very pretty.

Nitmiluk National Park is beautiful

Nitmiluk National Park is beautiful

As we approached the Visitor’s Center, this wallaby was busy and did not pay attention to the tourists taking her photo.

Wallaby at Nitmiluk National Park

Wallaby at Nitmiluk National Park

Wallabies look like small kangaroos.   We like this wallaby.   Some passengers on the Ghan took a short version of the cruise we enjoyed through the gorges.    We did a little hiking.

Hiking in Nitmiluk National Park

Hiking in Nitmiluk National Park

Back on the Ghan, we wanted to show you the inside of  train passenger car.

Inside our car on The Ghan

Inside our car on The Ghan

The dining car looked like the one we showed you on the Indian Pacific train.    In the morning the landscape had changed.

Earth is red approaching Alice Springs this morning. Blurry since train is moving quickly

Earth is red approaching Alice Springs this morning.   Blurry since train is moving quickly

As we approached Alice Springs, in the center of Australia, the dirt is red and we are entering desert areas.   We arrive in Alice Springs.

The Ghan arrives at Alice Springs

The Ghan arrives at Alice Springs

This camel statue is here to welcome all the passengers to Alice Springs.

Camel statue at Alice Springs Ghan station

Camel statue at Alice Springs Ghan station

We are leaving the train here and flying to Ayers Rock Airport where we will see Uluru, or Ayers Rock.   In the airport, we visited the restroom.   This was a new sign for us.

In the airport. This was an unfamiliar sign for us

In the airport. This was an unfamiliar sign for us

We liked our Australian train trips.   We hope you travel by train there, too.

Kakadu National Park in Australia’s Northern Territory

Zeb and Eider are in Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory of Australia.   This park is huge.   It is 20,000 square kilometers, or 8,000 square miles of varied Australia landscape.   First we walked

Hiking in Kakadu National Park

Hiking in Kakadu National Park

to see some Aboriginal Rock Art.

Aboriginal rock art

Aboriginal rock art

Our National Geographic guide book says humans were here more than 20,000 years ago.   This sign explains what we are seeing.

With a yam?

With a yam?

Here is some art.

We admire this aboriginal rock art

We admire this aboriginal rock art

This one is also interesting.

Aboriginal rock are

Aboriginal rock art

Now we are getting on another boat.

We love river boat rides

We love river boat rides

We love these boat rides.   There are so many of these brown, wood ducks.

So many ducks along the river bank

So many ducks along the river bank

Aren’t these flowers in the lily pads beautiful?

We like lily pads and bright flowers

We like lily pads and bright flowers

We really like them.   Kakadu National Park is home to both salt water and fresh water crocodiles.   We believe this is a fresh water crocodile.

A really big crocodile at Kakadu

A really big crocodile at Kakadu enjoying the sun.

This bird seems to be looking for a snack.

Bird seems to want a snack

Bird seems to want a snack

He caught a fish and is trying to position the fish so he can eat now.

Now, how to eat this fish

Now, how to eat this fish

Kakadu National Park has 290 species of birds and 74 species of reptiles.   There are also more than 1,600 species of plants and over 52 different types of fish.   Today we saw so many birds.   These white birds are great.

Pretty white birds

Pretty white birds

These white and grayish blue birds are also wonderful.

The beaks match the wings

The beaks match the wings

We really like their beaks.   This looks like a type of eagle.

Type of eagle?

Type of eagle?

After our boat trip, we visited the Warradjan Aboriginal Culture Center.

Cultural Center at Kakadu

Cultural Center at Kakadu

The aboriginal calendar at Kakadu shows 6 seasons.

Six seasons here. We are enjoying the dry season.

Six seasons here. We are enjoying the dry season.

The cultural center was very interesting, but photos were not allowed in many exhibits.   If you go, we think you would enjoy the center.    Before we leave Kakadu National Park, we want to remind you that no boat ride here would be complete without a pelican.

Always admire pelicans

Always admire pelicans

Australia’s Northern Territory is so wild and seems to be as it was thousands of years ago.   When you go, you will feel the difference in the Northern Territory.   We did.

Katherine Gorge in Nitmiluk National Park with Zeb and Eider Duck

Zeb and Eider Duck are going to another Australian National Park   We are going to Nitmiluk National Park.   Nitmiluk National Park was formerly called Katherine Gorge National Park.   First we go to Edith Falls

Beautiful Edith Falls in Nitmiluk National Park

Beautiful Edith Falls in Nitmiluk National Park

Several humans are swimming in the water.

Swimming in Edith Falls pool

Swimming in Edith Falls pool

It is so refreshing.   The water from the falls flows under the bridge and becomes a peaceful river.

Edith Falls feeds this serene river

Edith Falls feeds this serene river

Near Edith Falls, we enjoyed this grassy area.

Would be great picnic place if we had more time

Is a great picnic place

Now we are getting on a boat on the Katherine River.

On the boat to tour Katherine Gorge

On the boat to tour Katherine Gorge

Heading through the first gorge.

Boating on first gorge

Boating on first gorge

Pretty steep rock walls, really sandstone walls,  here.

Steep rock walls of gorge

Steep sandstone walls of gorge

People can rent canoes here also.

Canoes are available

Canoes are available

We get out of our boat and walk toward this narrower gorge.

Walking to second gorge

Walking to second gorge

Now we are on the second boat,

Riding on boat on the second gorge

Riding on boat on the second gorge

cruising again.   But, we are not alone here.

Big crocodile. They SAY fresh water crocodiles will not bother us. But stay clear!!

Big crocodile!   They SAY fresh water crocodiles will not bother us.  But stay clear!!

This is the famous view in Katherine Gorge.

Postcard view in Katherine Gorge

Postcard view in Katherine Gorge

There are many postcards with this picture.   Heading into a small cave,

Into the cave

Into the cave

we see these mud nest made by migrating birds and bats.

Mud nests on roof of cave

Mud nests on roof of cave

We dock, get off the boat, and walk along the path to where our first boat left us.

Pathway between two gorges

Pathway between two gorges

Back on the first boat, we are heading back to our starting point.

Enjoying boat ride in Katherine Gorge

Enjoying boat ride in Katherine Gorge

This is a beautiful river and an incredible gorge.   Some of the people that helped us today in this national park are Jawoyn, the local people.   They were here first and are now the custodians of Nitmiluk National Park.   We loved our cruise.   We hope you go on it soon, too.