Sasquatch, Giant Beaver, Huge Sundial as Colorado Traveling Ducks head back to USA

I, Zeb the Duck, don’t like what I’m hearing from the humans.   Again, we have to hurry to get back to Colorado.   But, of course, we ducks will insist on a few stops.

Sasquatch at Sasquatch Crossing

Here we are at Sasquatch Crossing.   Sasquatch is in front of his restaurant.   Too bad we already ate.   Still heading towards the United States, but still on the Alaska Highway, we stop for Muffler Man a little north of Fort St. John.

Muffler Man north of Fort St. John

We stopped for the night at Fort St. John while heading north.   As you may remember, there was snow.   We had snow every day while heading north.   It is nice now, so Chloe took us all for a walk.

Walk time for Chloe and her mom

She needs exercise, and so do all of us.   Back with Muffler Man, we ducks sit on his shoes and on the top of posts.

We are all here with Muffler Man. And his really big axe

Can you find us?  We have arrived at Dawson Creek, the official southern end of the Alaska Highway, or AlCan (Alaska Canada) Highway.

Beginning of the Alaska Highway in Dawson Creek, B.C. Canada

From this point there are a couple choices of roads to arrive in the USA.   The most scenic way isn’t safe yet.   The lakes are still frozen and the roads are icy and closed in places.   Another trip to Canada’s parks and beautiful lakes in the mountains will be needed.   We continue east and stop at Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada.

World’s Largest Beaver in Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada

We saw this giant beaver last year and we just had to stop here again.   We stop for the night at Grands Prairie at the Stonebridge Hotel.

Stonebridge Hotel, Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada

The hotel was nice, comfortable and clean, but the complimentary breakfast was incredible.   Definitely the best complimentary breakfast ever.   A huge buffet, white tablecloths, selections of fresh cut fruit, pastries, assortment of cheeses and cold cuts.   Variety of yogurt, cereal, boiled eggs, and two types scrambled eggs.   Warming trays of bacon and sausage.   Bagels, assorted breads and a waffle station.   And even more that we forgot.   We don’t usually describe our food, but this was a fabulous complimentary buffet.   The Stonebridge Hotel in Grand Prairie certainly deserves recognition for this.   And the employees were so efficient and so nice.   A great hotel experience for us.    In the morning we stopped at the Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Center.

Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada

This is a huge sundial.

Giant sundial

The sundial is tall and casts a shadow on or between posts to show visitors the time.

Ducks on post. Posts for time with sundial

Here we are on the post for 12:00.   The brick circle of cement identifies Grande Prairie AB (Alberta) Canada.

Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada

We love this sundial.   But it is time to head south again.   Those humans have commitments in Colorado in a few days.   So off we go.  And I’ll tell you now, we only made a few fun stops between Grande Prairie and the USA, but they were delicious.   A couple stops at Dairy Queen for Blizzards.   Canada has flavors that we don’t have at home.   We had to try as many as we could.   Our moms really loved the Oh Henry Peanut Butter Blizzard.   Just heavenly.   But no photos.   Those humans want no evidence of these Dairy Queen stops.

Driving North to Alaska with the Colorado Traveling Ducks

That’s right.   We, the Colorado Traveling Ducks, two humans and one dog drove back to North Pole, Alaska.   We were gone for over a month and had a great time.   We needed to interview and choose a new realtor in North Pole, Alaska.   We have mom’s brother’s house that needs to be sold, so we drove directly to North Pole.   That is a town near Fairbanks, Alaska.   Not much stopping on the way north, but we do have a few things to show you along the way.   First photo stop was in Dawson Creek, Alaska.

Beginning of the Alaska Highway in Dawson Creek, B.C. Canada

This is the official  beginning of the Alaska Highway, or the Alcan (Alaska Canadian highway.)   Here we are at the official beginning.   Nearby is an older sign post, covered with stickers from earlier travelers.

Sign with stickers from previous travelers

And we don’t want to forget the statue of the surveyor.

Honoring the surveyors

Surveyors were very important during the building of this highway.   Soapy Smith Duck’s mom and Soapy’s dog, Chloe, are wandering around near the Visitor’s Center in Dawson Creek.

Dawson Creek

But we are a little concerned.   Chloe, our traveling dog, is part pit bull, and Dawson Creek and other Canadian cities have restriction for pit bulls.   We are not sure if part pit bull will be a problem, but we won’t stay long in towns with these restrictions.   Chloe is in the blue Jeep and ready to go.

Chloe is ready to leave Dawson Creek

As we drove north, with the exception of the day we left Denver, we had snow every day.   Some days just a little, and a couple days quite a snow storm took place.   We spent one night here at Northern Rockies Lodge.

Welcome to Northern Rockies Lodge

This is a beautiful log building on the scenic Muncho Lake.

Northern Rockies Lodge

The dining room looks through the trees and onto Muncho Lake.

Dining room with windows and a beautiful view

Today, May 2, the lake is frozen.

Muncho Lake is frozen

We will return here in 2 1/2 weeks and we were amazed at the difference.   But more about that later.  On this road trip there are three of the Colorado Traveling Ducks.  We are me, Zeb the Duck, Soapy Smith Duck and Eider Duck.   Eider Duck lived most of his life in Alaska, so he was very eager to return for a visit.    Closer to the lodge, Chloe and Soapy’s mom arrived up the path from the Muncho Lake.   We didn’t drive very far today.   We spent most of the morning and early afternoon enjoying walking around the lake and soaking in the wintery scenery.   We love Northern Rockies Lodge.

Colorado Traveling Ducks Reach Dawson Creek

This morning we checked out of our hotel, Fort Nelson Hotel in Fort Nelson, British Columbia.

Inside Fort Nelson Hotel. View from our room

This was the view from our room window.    We saw the indoor pool.   Look at the carving on the balcony to our right.   This morning was different.   Our moms said we needed to hurry, we had a long drive today.   What?  We have never known how far we would get any day.   We just drove and stopped to look and explore where ever we wanted.   Something is different today.   We have traveled a little over 1,000 miles in more than one week.   Not traveling very fast or very far each day.   Now, the moms tell us we have to drive about 2,000 miles in three days. OK, we can do this, but why??  Soapy and his mom have flights to visit a friend in Tampa, Florida.   OK, let’s get going.   We are still driving through and admiring the gorgeous scenery, of course.   First stop is in Dawson Creek, British Columbia.    This is the official beginning (or for us, the end) of the Alaska Highway.

Official beginning of Alaska Highway in Dawson Creek

We enjoyed our trip, but why was the Alaska Highway built, and why did it need to be completed so fast?   The tourist information says this:   The Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 forced the America and Canadian governments to re-evaluate the security of North America.  They needed a secure supply route to haul military goods and materials from the lower states to Alaska and it had to be completed in less than one year.   The story of the men, the equipment, and their triumphs over nature to open the northern passage is as legendary as the men who risked their lives to build the highway.  Next to the official beginning of the Alaska Highway is another sign explaining things, but it is covered with bumper stickers now.   But you can see it is mile 0 here.

Milepost 0. Lots of bumper stickers here.

This is an exciting drive for many motorists.   Across the street, we saw the Surveyor Statue.

Surveyor Statue

This statue is a tribute to the tens of thousands of men who arrived in Dawson Creek in the spring of 1942 to build the Alaska Highway.  The Iron Surveyor statue stands as a reminder of the amazing feat and of those who lost their lives in the effort.  Standing above the traffic circle that leads you onto the famous highway, the surveyor points northwest along the path that became first a mud track and finally the paved highway we have today.   Created by local sculptor, Karl Mattson, whose family has ranched in the region for generations, the statue is welded from scrap metal from local farms.   The clothing and surveyor’s transit are true to the style of the 1940’s.  If you go to Dawson Creek, spend some time here to visit museums and walk around the town.   There is so much history and so many interesting things to see here.  But we have to keep driving for the next there days.   Our next stop was for a beaver.

World’s Largest Beaver in Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada

Here we are in Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada.   In 2004 this giant statue of a beaver was built here, next to the Visitor’s Center.   Each town along the Alaska Highway and roads leading to Dawson Creek, try to have a reason for travelers and tourists to stop.   Beaverlodge has, according to Roadside America, the world’s largest beaver.   This beaver is 15 feet tall, 18 feet long and sits on a log that is 20 feet long.   And, weighs 3,000 pounds.   The beaver was built to commemorate the town’s 75th anniversary.   This was our last photo stop.   We drove to Edmonton, Canada tonight.   The next day we drove south through Calgary, Canada and into Great Falls, Montana, USA.   Another long drive and we arrived home, west of Denver, Colorado.   This was a great trip, but of course, we did not see everything.   Some day we would like to drive leisurely, through the USA and Canada to Dawson Creek.   There is so much more to see, but maybe???  So many place to see, so little time to travel and explore.  We hope you drive all or part of the way to Fairbanks, Alaska.   It was beautiful and fun.