Tunnel Creek National Park in The Kimberley with Zeb and Eider Duck

We leave our Safari Tent, driving the 115 kilometers from Fitzroy Crossing, to Tunnel Creek National Park.   Along the way, we admire these rocks.

Love the rocks

Love the rocks

The horses are nice, also.

Horses by the ride to Tunnel Creek National Park

Horses by the ride to Tunnel Creek National Park

We must remember that this area around Fitzroy Crossing is some of the best pasture land in Australia.  We arrive at Tunnel Creek National Park.

We are at Tunnel Creek National Park

We are at Tunnel Creek National Park

We are still in the area that was once covered by tropical sea and the Devonian Reef.   Tunnel Creek is one of the three national parks in the 350 million year old Devonian Reef.   We are in Western Australia’s oldest cave system.   To enter the tunnel, a torch, or flashlight, is needed.   You will also get wet, so appropriate shoes are encouraged.   We are near the entrance to the tunnel.

Near tunnel entrance

Near tunnel entrance

Jandamarra, an Aboriginal leader, died here.   When Jandamarra was a boy, he was arrested for spearing a settler’s sheep.   He did not learn all the rules of his Bunuba people, did some things wrong and was shunned by the tribe.   He worked for the police as an aboriginal tracker.   He and his police friend, Richardson, hunted and found the aboriginals.   They found Jandamarra’s tribe.   Jandamarra realized his loyalty to his people and killed Richardson.   He led the Bunuba people in raids against the settlers for about 3 years.   Jandamarra was later found by the police and killed near here, in 1897, by the entrance to the tunnel.

Caves near entrance to tunnel

Caves near entrance to tunnel

Walking inside the dark tunnel, you will come to this pool.

Pool in tunnel

Pool in tunnel

The tunnel is also known for these impressive stalactites.

Great stalactites

Great stalactites

Near the exit of the tunnel, be sure to notice this aboriginal art carving.

Aboriginal art

Aboriginal art

The only way back to the bus is to return through the 750 meter tunnel, with your torch or flashlight.   Outside the tunnel, there are hiking opportunities.

For driving or hiking

For driving or hiking

We loved these noisy white birds.

So pretty and so loud

So pretty and so loud

They are corellas, a relative of the cockatoo.   The limestone cliffs are magnificent.

Limestone cliffs

Limestone cliffs

Looking around, several of these beautiful and loud white birds, corellas, were watching us.

There were several corellas in the trees

There were several corellas in the trees

Leaving the tunnel area, we stopped at the Lilliwooloora Police Stations ruins.

Lilliwooloora Police Station Ruins

Lilliwooloora Police Station Ruins

This is where Jandamarra shot and killed his police friend, Richardson.

Lilliwooloora Police Station Ruins

Lilliwooloora Police Station Ruins

We think you would love to see this area and experience a walk through the tunnel.

Zeb and Eider Visit Geikie Gorge National Park in Australia’s Kimberley

We are in Geikie Gorge National Park in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia.   This area was once  covered by tropical seas.   The area includes 3 National Parks.   We will visit all of them, but now we are in the Geikie Gorge.   These parks originated as the western Australia reef, around 350 million years ago, during the Devonian Period, and now feature rocky landscapes and formations and gorges.   We are promised views of the most spectacular landforms in the Kimberley Region.

A tropical sea and tropical reef were here

A tropical sea and tropical reef were here

While waiting for our boat, we take a short walk.

Let's walk and see Geikie National Park

Let’s walk and see Geikie National Park

Vegetation and rock formations are beautiful and abundant.   The tree trunks are even colorful.

These tree trunks fascinated us.

These tree trunks fascinated us.

We love this place!   Our boat is now ready for us.

We wil ride on another boat!

We wil ride on another boat!

Today the Fitzroy River is calm and we are cruising beneath towering cliffs of the Devonian reef.

Fitzroy River is calm and beautiful today

Fitzroy River is calm and beautiful today

We can see the waterline by the color of the rock.    During The Wet, rainy season, the Fitzroy River rises 16.5 meters, staining the walls and flooding the National Park with 7 meters of water.    The colors of the cliffs here are so bright.

Bright colors and bright reflection

Bright colors and bright reflection

Great reflection in the Fitzroy River.    We heading into a cave.

Into cave with fossils on wall

Into cave with fossils on wall

This wall is so full of fossils preserved in the ancient limestone reef.   Also migrating birds and bats build mud nests here.

Mud nests built by migrating bats and birds

Mud nests built by migrating bats and birds

The Fitzroy River has many fish, so there will other animals here.

A fresh water crocodile

A fresh water crocodile

This fresh water crocodile is not supposed to be aggressive, unless provoked.   We will give him plenty of room.   This calm river is so different from the flooding of The Wet.

Cruising down the Fitzroy River

Cruising down the Fitzroy River

Had to imagine the floods, but they arrive every year.   This gorge is reported to be 30 meters deep and is between the Oscar and Geike Ranges.  This bird was so still.

Calm bird on river bank and reflected in river

Calm bird on river bank and reflected in river

We like reflections in the still river.   Our cruise is almost over, but the bright colors on the rocks just take our breath away.

Vivid colors

Vivid colors

We hope you come here in The Dry.   It is beautiful.   Next time we will visit another of Australia’s national parks.