Exmouth Australia During World War II with Zeb and Eider

During World War II Australia and the United States often worked together.   Remember that the United States entered World War II after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941.   The US declared war on Japan.   In 1942 the US had ships docking in Fremantle, Australia which is southwest, near Perth.   A refueling port further north was needed for the submarines.   The US and Australia each built bases near Exmouth.

Operation Potshot Monument

Operation Potshot Monument

The US stayed here from 1942-1944.    The two countries worked very close in this area.

Balls of Steel

Balls of Steel

These balls of Steel, or ball float, were anchored in the nearby Gulf and used as a mooring point by boats or barges involved in Operation Potshot.

Zeb and Eider visited the site of the former US basis, called Operation Potshot.   At this monument, there are several signs explaining the differences and similarities of conditions for the soldiers from each country.

Operation Potshot Monument

Operation Potshot Monument

We think you would find these signs interesting.   During this time the Japanese military was very aggressive in southeast Asia.   Japan had moved through Thailand, into Malaysia and Singapore.   Singapore is very close to northern Australia.   During World War II Japan bombed northern Australia very heavily.

Australia attacked by Japanese

Australia attacked by Japanese

Broome and Darwin were frequent targets.   Operation Jaywalk, a joint effort of 14 men from Australia and Britain, left Exmouth from the US base, September 2, 1943.

Tank Float

Tank Float

Tank floats were steel pontoons hitched together to form floating docks.

These men conducted a raid on the Japanese ships in Singapore.   As  result, 7 Japanese ships sank or were seriously damaged.   All 14 men returned to the US Base at Exmouth October 19, 1943.

From Operation Jaywick

From Operation Jaywick

From Operation Jaywick

From Operation Jaywick also

The US base was heavily damaged during the Cyclone of February 3, 1945.   We, the Colorado Traveling are not history experts, but we are happy to see that both countries were able to work together to help end World War II.

Operation Potshot

Operation Potshot

These monuments are very interesting and informative.

Submarines need refueling port

Submarines need refueling port

We think they would be worth some of your time when you are in the area of Exmouth, Western Australia.   Standing by the monuments, the Indian Ocean in on one side and sheep grazing in a pasture are on the other side.

We love this guy

We love this guy

We like seeing all the sheep.

Grazing sheep

Grazing sheep

More peaceful now than during the war.

Operation Potshot Monument

Operation Potshot Monument

Exmouth on the Ningaloo Reef with Zeb and Eider Duck

From Coral Bay we continued north to Exmouth.   We made it!

We are in Exmouth, Western Australia

We are in Exmouth, Western Australia

Turtles are born here.   However it was not turtle season when we were there, but this is the path to one of the nesting beaches.

Turtle Rookery

Turtle Rookery

Looks like a nice beach.

Turtle nesting beach

Turtle nesting beach

Further along the beach we liked this turtle sculpture.

Ceramic turtle

Turtle Sculpture

The small town was very nice and the people friendly.    This is the Koobooroo Oval, and sports field.

Koobooroo Oval in Exmouth

Koobooroo Oval in Exmouth

We liked the trees planted around the oval.   In Coral Bay we showed you the beaches, so today we will show you the Vlaming Head Lighthouse.

Vlaming Head Lighthouse

Vlaming Head Lighthouse

This lighthouse is 17 km from the town of Exmouth.   Since it is built on the northern most tip of Cape Range, it is one of the few places in Australia where you can watch the sun rise and also set.   Building the lighthouse had been under consideration for  few years, but in 1907 when the SS Mildura sank here and many good men were lost, the lighthouse building date was accelerated.   The lighthouse was completed in 1912 and was a welcome addition to this coast.   This is the anchor from the SS Mildura.

Anchor from SS Mildura ship

Anchor from SS Mildura ship

The view from the lighthouse is wonderful.   Many people report seeing the migrating whale shark from here.   The ocean current here made an unusual pattern on the Indian Ocean.

Unusual currents viewed from lighthouse

Unusual currents viewed from lighthouse

From the lighthouse 13 tall towers are visible.

13 tall towers

13 tall towers

During the 1960s the US Navy was granted permission from Australia to build these towers to aid in the US communication network.   During our visit to Australia, we learned about many joint military efforts between the United States and Australia.   We will show you more of these sites soon.   Leaving the Vlaming Head Lighthouse, we saw this friendly emu.

Friendly emu

Friendly emu

Emus are very common in and around Exmouth.   We are still enjoying our road trip up the western coast of Australia.   We hope you enjoy some of our explanations and photos also.