Independence Pass in Colorado

I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck crossed Independence Pass this summer. In Colorado we have several mountain passes. Independence Pass crosses the Continental Divide.

We are almost at the top of the world

We are almost at the top of the world

Just to remind you, the water that is west of the continental divide flows to the Pacific Ocean. The water that is east of the continental divide flows to the Atlantic Ocean. Of course, all of the water does not reach the oceans as much goes for agriculture, for animal use and for human use.

Independence pass is 12,095 feet above sea level. You can see surrounding mountains are higher. This pass is closed in the winter. Today, in the summer, there is still snow on top of the mountains

This is snow is cold!

This is snow is cold!

and we are on top of the snow.

There are no trees up here. We are above timberline. That means the weather is too severe for trees to grow.

Windswept mountain top with summer snow

Windswept mountain top with summer snow

Timberline is determined by temperature and latitude.  Some times timberline is called tree line.

On either side of the pass, the streams, created by melting snow, are just beautiful. In Colorado we have many mountain passes and several cross the continental divide.

Melting snow gives us these cold streams

Melting snow gives us these cold streams

Zeb and Soapy just wanted to remind you about mountain passes and about the significance of the continental divide. Visit Colorado this summer. You will enjoy traveling through our mountains and passes and over the continental divide.