Laramie, Wyoming and the Union Pacific Railroad

I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck, went to Laramie, Wyoming.   Laramie was founded in 1868 when the Union Pacific Railroad came to town.   This sign tells about early Laramie.

Laramie in the early days

Laramie in the early days

We will talk about the women of Laramie on a later day.   Since the Union Pacific was a huge influence in the founding of Laramie, let’s talk about the railroad.   This is the old train station.

This luggage cart is great for ducks, also

This luggage cart is great for ducks, also

We liked the luggage cart here.  There are no passenger trains coming to this station now, so the train station is now a museum.   This sign is reminiscent of the past.

Once this was a very busy train station

Once this was a very busy train station

We saw the engine and some cars from an old train.

Winters here must have a lot of snow.

Winters here must have a lot of snow.

The plow on the front of the engine looks like it could clear the train track in any weather.

There are many train tracks.  This bridge allows pedestrians to cross all these tracks.

Great bridge system

Great bridge system

We ducks are ready to cross the bridge, maybe.

Too many stairs for ducks to climb

Too many stairs for ducks to climb

It was too big for us, so we were carried.  Thanks mom.   This is really a long bridge.

Long bridge to cross all the train tracks.

Long bridge to cross all the train tracks.  It was too windy for us.

We spend some time in Laramie and thought it was a nice town.   The University of Wyoming is in Laramie, also. We liked Laramie and hope you will visit and enjoy this city also.   We are happy the Union Pacific Railroad came here to start the city of Laramie.

Ames Monument in Wyoming

Wyoming has a pyramid. I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck, saw a pyramid in Wyoming.

Ames Monument in Wyoming

Ames Monument in Wyoming

It is made of light colored native granite and is 60 feet tall.   This monument, completed in 1882, was commissioned and paid for by the Union Pacific Railroad.

President Abraham Lincoln thought a transcontinental railroad would greatly benefit the United States.  President Lincoln asked a US Representative from Massachusetts, Oakes Ames, to arrange for the completion of the railroad.   Oakes and his brother Oliver’s strong support, drive and influence, resulted in the railroad being completed in 1869.   The Ames brothers were wealthy businessmen.   They had inherited Ames shovel manufacturing company.  They filled the need for quality shovels during the California Gold Rush.   They also sold shovels for railroad work, the Civil War, and some shovels used while constructing the Panama Canal.

The Union Pacific Railroad was so grateful, that they built this monument to the Ames brothers.   The east side of the pyramid features a portrait of Oakes Ames.

Portrait of Oakes Ames

Portrait of Oakes Ames

The west side of the pyramid features a portrait of Oliver Ames.

Portrait of Oliver Oakes

Portrait of Oliver Oakes

The north side of the pyramid, which was a few hundred feet from the railroad, says “In memory of Oakes Ames and Oliver Ames”.

Engraving honoring Ames brothers on north side near train tracks

Engraving honoring Ames brothers on north side near train tracks

At the time of construction the town of Sherman was here and was utilized by the railroad.   Later the railroad moved 3 miles south and Sherman is now deserted.   The monument is located at the highest point of the transcontinental railroad, 8247 feet above sea level.

This monument, located 20 miles east of Laramie on I-80, is on the US National Register of Historic Places.   This monument may look out of place in the Wyoming landscape, but at a closer look you can see it was build to mimic the surrounding features of the mountain landscape.

Monument in Wyoming with storm clouds

Monument in Wyoming with storm clouds

We ducks were there, but pyramid is big, ducks are small and the powerful Wyoming wind was blowing us away.

If you are traveling on I-80 through Wyoming, stop to see this monument.  We believe you will enjoy seeing this piece of history.

Pinecliffe, Colorado

About 40 miles from Denver, in Coal Creek Canyon, is the little town of Pinecliffe.

We visited Pinecliffe, Colorado

We visited Pinecliffe, Colorado

I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck, stopped there.   Our first stop was the Pinecliffe Post Office.

We loved this post office and the post mistress was so nice

We loved this post office and the post mistress was so nice

We went inside for mom to purchase a sheet of stamps.   This post office is great for stamp collectors. Mom looked through the book of available stamps. She had not even seen some of them.  We left the post office with much more than on e sheet of stamps.  And, I think we will be back. Mom saves some of the sheets, but she likes to use different stamps on the mail we send.

This Union Pacific train came through Pinecliffe.

We love trains.  Doesn't everyone?

We love trains.  Doesn’t everyone?

Mom thinks we had a relative that worked for the railroad and lived in Pinecliffe.  We like trains.

Pinecliffe is a pretty little town in the mountains and South Boulder Creek flows through town.   This is a view from the road looking upstream, back to town.

Looking back to Pinecliffe

Looking back to Pinecliffe

This is South Boulder Creek flowing away from town toward Denver and Boulder.

South Boulder Creek flowing down the mountain

South Boulder Creek flowing down the mountain

We liked peaceful Pinecliffe, and we like knowing that a relative lived and worked here many years ago.  You would enjoy driving in Coal Creek Canyon and visiting Pinecliffe.