Remembering Baltimore’s Heroes

Zeb the Duck here in Baltimore.   Skipping dinner, we walked in a different direction. First we encountered Battle Monument. Honoring those who died in the War of 1812, this 39-foot monument was built in 1815-1825.

Battle Monument with Zeb

Battle Monument with Zeb

Designed by J. Maximilian M. Godefroy notice the Egyptian Revival cenotaph base and Carrara marble statue of a female figure on the top.   The lady, wearing a crown of victory and holding a wreath in one hand and ship’s rudder in the other, represents the City of Baltimore. This monument, often called Lady Baltimore, is on the seal and the flag of the City of Baltimore.

Fountains to soothe

Fountains to soothe

Fountains add tranquility near the statue to the Negro Heroes.

Honoring Negro Heroes

Honoring Negro Heroes

I am proud to sit on the boot of an American hero.

Monument to heroes

Monument to heroes

Across the park is the War Memorial.

Baltimore's War Memorial

Baltimore’s War Memorial

This is a “place of meeting for all veteran, patriotic and civic organizations, a depository for trophies of wars in which our country has engaged, and a tribute to those citizens of Maryland who gave their lives and services to their country in World War I.” On the terrace in front of the War Memorial we saw the two sculptured sea horses. These sea horses represent the “Might of America crossing the seas to aid our allies.” One horse represents the Navy

Sea horse with osprey for Navy

Sea horse with osprey for Navy

and the other represents the army.

Sea horse with eagle representing the army

Sea horse with eagle representing the army

Looking ahead, I spotted the Phoenix Shot Tower, sometimes called the Old Baltimore Shot Tower. It is 215 feet tall and used about 1.1 million bricks (manufactured by Burns and Russell Company of Baltimore.) The Shot Tower was built in 1828.

Phoenix Shot Tower in Baltimore

Phoenix Shot Tower in Baltimore

Molten led was dropped from a platform at the top of the tower, through a sieve-like device, into a vat of cold water at the bottom of the tower. Both “drop shot” for pistols and rifles and “moulded shot” for larger weapons such as cannons were produced. Production stopped in 1892 when new methods of shot production were introduced. This information is from www.carrollmuseums.org and from Wikipedia.  Again, mom and I had no more time.  Next session of our conference starts soon.  You will enjoy your visit to Baltimore. Summer is a great time to explore the area.

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