Western Colorado Coal Mines

Driving through Western Colorado, I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck, saw coal mines.  We were there, but did not get in any photos.  Coal mining is big and we ducks are very small.

Inclines to transport coal in Somerset

Inclines to transport coal in Somerset

Coal mining began in Somerset and Bowie, Colorado in 1902.   The mining is underground, but it does not appear that the mines are active now.

The first town we entered was Somerset.

Welcome to Somerset

Welcome to Somerset

This is some of what we saw there.

To transport coal

To transport coal

Coal mining has been a major source of employment for people since 1902.

Pile of coal in Somerset, Colorado

Pile of coal in Somerset, Colorado

Further down the road, we found Bowie.  In 1902 the King Mine opened.

Photo from roadside sign on West Elk Loop

Photo from roadside sign on West Elk Loop

This mine was owned and managed by three generations of the Bowie family.  We liked this sign, the photo and explanation of coal mining in Colorado.  Hope you like it, too.

There is a lot of history here.

Bowie coal inclines

Bowie coal inclines

Coal mining employed many people in this area of Colorado.   The coal was transported from the mines to other areas of Colorado and the country.

These inclines moved coal from mines to railroad cars to be transported

These inclines moved coal from mines to railroad cars to be transported

However the outlook for coal mining here does not look very bright.  We hope you visit Somerset and Bowie soon.

 

Marble, Colorado with Zeb and Soapy Smith Duck

Western Colorado’s town of Marble should not be missed.

Entering Marble, Colorado

Entering Marble, Colorado

Leaving highway 133 the road to Marble shows bright homes

Really loved the flowers and this home near Marble

Really loved the flowers and this home near Marble

and beautiful Colorado scenery.

Beautiful place to fish but no fishing poles with us.

Beautiful place to fish but no fishing poles with us.

This area was open for fishing. Continuing on the road to Marble you will see marble blocks

Large pieces of marble

Large pieces of marble

waiting to be carved or used in monuments and buildings.

The Marble Gallery has many marble sculptures outside.

The Marble Gallery has so much stuff

The Marble Gallery has so much stuff

This cat looks ready to hunt.

Tell him we are friendly ducks, not tasty ducks

Tell him we are friendly ducks, not tasty ducks

Zeb and Soapy Smith Duck are a little nervous.

Great detail here

Great detail here

This fish is huge.

Zeb and Soapy could never land a fish of this size

Zeb and Soapy could never land a fish of this size

These were the only bears we saw today.

Mom and cub

Mom and cub

Marble, Colorado is the home of the Yule Marble Quarry.   Marble from this quarry was used to construct the Lincoln Memorial in 1914.   Also in Washington DC marble from the Yule Marble Quarry was used for the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in 1930.

The Crystal River area provides many outdoor activities during the entire year. The river runs clear and the scenery is unsurpassed.

Beaver Lake but we do not have a canoe

Beaver Lake but we do not have a canoe

Marble is also home to Beaver Lake where many enjoy non-motorized watercraft activities. Marble is a small town, showing the beauty and outdoor wonders of Colorado. We hope you visit this friendly town soon.

Veteran’s Day 2014

We, the Colorado Traveling Ducks, and our humans, wish you all a very Happy Veteran’s Day.  This day, November 11, 1918, is recognized as the end of the battles of World War I.  This holiday was first called Armistice Day, but President Eisenhower changed it to Veteran’s Day.

We thank all of you that have served or are presently servicing.   We appreciate and value your sacrifice to preserve our freedom.

Thank you Veterans

Thank you Veterans

Veteran’s Day Festival 2014

Saturday, November 8, 2014 we went to Denver’s Civic Center Park for a festival. This festival was for American veterans.

Veteran's Day

Veteran’s Day

The parade was in the morning, followed by the festival.   It was fun.   We like veterans.   They protect the freedom we all enjoy.

We saw military vehicles.

We like it!

We like it!

This one should not drive on the highway.

This soldier was very nice to us, also

This soldier was very nice to us, also

It is a M29C Weasel, from 1944, and built by Studebaker.   It was used in World War II.   Look at these tires.

This is fabulous

This is fabulous

We liked all of these.

The people at Rocky Mountain Honor Flight had a great booth. They accept donations to take veterans, mostly World War II Veterans, to Washington D.C. to see the monuments dedicated to themselves, the American heroes.   The veterans do not pay for this trip, and if necessary a Guardian companion is provided for them.   This poster shows some veterans in Washington D.C. from prior trips.

Rocky Mountain Honor Flight

Rocky Mountain Honor Flight

For more information about Rocky Mountain Honor Flight, visit www.rockymountainhonorflight.org.

More groups help veterans.   We like people helping the veterans that preserve our life style.   We saw and heard this band.

Almost cut his hat off

Almost cut his hat off

The played while many veterans were eating.   Of course, I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck, and our moms also wanted to eat.   We tried one of the food trucks. Look at these sandwiches.

We love big sandwiches

We love big sandwiches

They were delicious.   You may have noticed our new duck relatives.   Our moms purchased them from another group that helps veterans.

Meet Candy Cane Duck and Gingerbread Duck

Meet Candy Cane Duck and Gingerbread Duck

We welcome Gingerbread Duck and Candy Cane Duck to the family.

Saturday was a warm, sunny day for a parade and festival. We hope you had a good weekend and attended a Veteran’s Day activity. Veteran’s Day is Tuesday, November 11, but many cities celebrate the Saturday before the holiday.

We love America

We love America

Fort Morgan, Colorado has a Museum

I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck, were in Fort Morgan.  We previously told you about the great park there.  Yesterday we showed you the famous Rainbow Arch Bridge.  Today let’s look at the museum.

Going to the museum in Fort Morgan, Colorado

Going to the museum in Fort Morgan, Colorado

The eastern plains of Colorado were populated with Native American Indians.

Life of Native American

Life of Native American

This museum has many displays about the Native Americans and the buffalo.   Then things changed in 1881 and 1882 when the railroad arrived.

The railroad arrives in Fort Morgan

The railroad arrives in Fort Morgan

The Union Pacific and the Burlington Route brought people and supplies to the Fort Morgan area.   Soon there were towns and a larger military presence.

More people move to Fort Morgan

More people move to Fort Morgan

The citizens of Fort Morgan and vicinity have always been ready to serve the United States.   During World War II, Fort Morgan Municipal airport housed one of the US Army’s Glider Schools.   Students learned to handle gliders by utilizing small, single engine aircraft and performed dead stick landings.

Fort Morgan is proud of its military past

Fort Morgan is proud of its military past

Student soldiers from across the nation called Fort Morgan home for the 6-week training period.

Like many small towns, the local drug store and soda fountain were a gathering place for all ages.

We would love this soda fountain

We would love this soda fountain

One of those teenagers was Glenn Miller. Glenn Miller was born in Iowa but moved to Fort Morgan with his family.   He played left end on the Fort Morgan High School football team.  In 1920 Glenn was named Best Left End in Colorado.  Glenn is probably the most famous graduate of Fort Morgan High School.   Glenn loved music.

Fort Morgan is proud of Glenn Miller

Fort Morgan is proud of Glenn Miller

The museum has an area dedicated to Glenn Miller.

Tribute to Glenn Miller

Tribute to Glenn Miller

Later The Glenn Miller Orchestra became one of the most popular bands of the big band era.  This museum shares a building with the Fort Morgan library.  We liked this museum and we think you would like it too.  When you are on I-76 Fort Morgan would be a great stop for you.

Rainbow Arch Bridge in Fort Morgan, Colorado

This is a great bridge.

Rainbow Arch Bridge in Fort Morgan, Colorado

Rainbow Arch Bridge in Fort Morgan, Colorado

I, Zeb the Duck, and Soapy Smith Duck, crossed the Rainbow Arch Bridge over the South Platte River in Fort Morgan.  This bridge was built in 1922 and 1923.

Looking through to South Platte River

Looking through to South Platte River

The bridge was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1984.  A few years later, in 1992, Rainbow Arch Bride was designated as a Colorado Civil Engineering Landmark.

One of eleven arches

One of eleven arches

The eleven arches on this bridge are great.   In 1911 James Barney Marsh, an engineer and bridge designer, received the patent for reinforced concrete arch bridges.  This bridge is 1100 feet long and 90 feet wide.

You can see all eleven arches here

You can see all eleven arches here

Rainbow Arch Bridge survived several floods, and now the bridge is open for pedestrian and bicycle traffic.

Looking through an arch and over the newer road for motorized traffic, to the South Platte River

Looking through an arch and over the newer road for motorized traffic, to the South Platte River

Another road has been built for automobile and regular traffic.

The Rainbow Arch Bridge in Fort Morgan is the only bridge of this type in Colorado and one of the longest in the country.  This bridge, crossing the South Platt River, is on Colorado Highway 52, less than one mile north of I-76 at exit 80.  You should see this bridge.  It is really an architectural masterpiece.

Great bridge and love the street lights

Great bridge and love the street lights

Heritage Museum in Limon, Colorado

I, Zeb the Duck, Soapy Smith Duck and little Pumpkin Duck, traveled about 90 miles east of Denver to Limon, Colorado.

Limon on the eastern plains of Colorado

Limon on the eastern plains of Colorado

We visited a nice museum.   The Heritage Museum is really two museums in one.

Heritage Museum in Limon

Heritage Museum in Limon

The museum is open only during the summer, from Memorial Day to Labor Day.   We were there this fall, so it was closed, but still interesting.   Many outside exhibits seemed permanent.

This stuff is great!

This stuff is great!

We started at the Limon Heritage Museum where we found old farm equipment.   Limon’s local history includes farms and ranches, Native American Indians and the railroad.   These tractors show changes over the years.

Tractors through the years

Tractors through the years

We liked this garden cultivator,

We ducks cannot push this

We ducks cannot push this garden cultivator

powered by human energy.

Walking along the farm and ranch equipment, within a couple blocks we are at the Limon Depot Museum.

Trains are fun

Trains are fun

This was a real train depot.  Here is the car that rides the train rails,

Moves on train tracks

Moves on train tracks

often used by employees.   This train has the snowplow.

Can plow through snow drifts

Can plow through snow drifts

The Pullman,

Would be fun to sleep on the train

Would be fun to sleep on the train

or sleeper car, is probably open in the summer. This picnic or rest area would be great on a warm day.  We liked sitting here.

Have a picnic or just relax here.

Have a picnic or just relax here.

If you are in or near Limon, stop here to relax and enjoy this museum.   Near the museum we saw this mural.

Very large mural

Very large mural

Limon’s history is portrayed here, including farming, Native American Indians and the railroad.  Limon is at the junction of US 40 and I-70.   Limon is a nice place for a stop of a few hours or a few days.  We liked our visit.