More from Rottnest Island with Zeb and Eider Duck

Rottnest Island was discovered by the Dutch in 1696.   The island was named Rottenest which means rat’s nest.   They believed the island to be inhabited by large rats.   However, they were not rats but quokkas.

Quokka

Quokka

Quokkas are marsupials; smaller relatives of the wallaby.   In 1838 Rottnest settlement was established as a prison for the Aborigines from the mainland.

Former prison

Former prison

Of course, the prison no longer exists, but you can wander around the convict built buildings,  such as the Quod.    In the Quod, prison cells have been converted into hotel rooms.   The Lomas Cottage has a large garden area.

Lomas House for warden. Often called Buckingham Palace

Lomas House for warden. Often called Buckingham Palace

It was nicknamed Buckingham Palace during the prison days, as the warden eventually lived here.    The prison guard’s homes are still here, with a different purpose today.

Former guard housing. Now shops

Former guard housing.   Now shops

Walking among the stores in the town area, we saw this peacock.

Rottnest Island peacock

Rottnest Island peacock

Very friendly and not at all nervous with humans.   We also liked these birds with the pink tummies.

Pink and gray galah

Pink and gray galah

Remember we told you the island was inhabited by quokkas, a smaller relative of the wallaby.    This one is about the size of a cat.

Quokka

Quokka

He is very friendly, but we should not feed him.   He does not digest human food very well.   His front feet are rather short and he hops like a wallaby or kangaroo.   This quokka likes the Colorado Traveling Ducks.

The quokka is our new friend

The quokka is our new friend

He hopped right to us, but did not bite us.   We told you many humans ride bikes around Rottnest Island.   We ducks tried it also.

We would like to ride these bikes, but...short legs

We would like to ride these bikes, but…short legs

Zeb and Eider liked the white sand beach.

Indian Ocean

Indian Ocean

The Indian Ocean looks so pretty today.

The Indian Ocean

The Indian Ocean

We went to the salt house.

The Salt House

The Salt House

This is now a gallery of island history.   Salt used to be a major source of income for Rottnest Island.   Now it is time for us to leave the island.

Leaving Rottnest Island

Leaving Rottnest Island

On the ferry back to Perth we saw people walking across the Swan River.

Walking across the Swan River

Walking across the Swan River

The tide was low and the sand bar allowed people to walk across.   Many were fishing.   We also saw all these sailboats.

Sailboats are so colorful

Sailboats are so colorful

We really liked the ferry and our day on Rottnest Island.   You would like it also.

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