Macaneta Island, Mozambique with Zeb the Duck

Today is our last full day in Mozambique and we are going to an island.   I, Zeb the Duck, love water, so I really love islands.   Alfonso picks us up at our hotel and we start driving, passing along the coast of Maputo Bay.

Maputo Bay

Maputo Bay

Leaving the city, we turn from the coastline, and continue driving in rural Mozambique.

Rural Mozambique

Rural Mozambique

After 40 minutes of driving, we encounter the town of Marracuene, walk 10 minutes to the Nikomati River. We wait to get on the small Nikomati River Ferry.

Nikomati River Ferry

Nikomati River Ferry

Our ferry takes six cars and many people.   The bridge you see on the left is not completed, so driving is not an option to cross the river.   We watch these people cleaning and cutting fish by the Nikomati River.

Cleaning fish

Cleaning fish

We stood on the ferry with many other people and watched the town of Marracuene fading away.

Leaving Marracuene

Leaving Marracuene

The cars in line are waiting for their turn to cross the river.  On the other side, we are met by a truck from the resort.   Driving on these roads is exciting.

Driving to the resort

Driving to the resort

Everything is so sandy here.   Afonso said many years ago crops were grown in this area, but the ocean gets too high in the rainy season and the ground has too much salt to produce crops now.   Perhaps this is our welcoming committee?

Welcoming committee?

Welcoming committee?

Or is this immigration,checking our passports?   But I like cows, so I, Zeb the Duck, am happy to see them.    Here we are.   This was our transport and we have arrived at Tan ‘n Biki Resort.

Arrived at Tan 'n Biki Resort

Arrived at Tan ‘n Biki Resort

We will have lunch here today.   This pool certainly looks inviting.

Looks good

Looks good

But mom says no swimming today.   After ordering our lunch, we returned to our transport vehicle.

Our transportation. Can I drive?

Our transportation.  Can I drive?

Now we are visiting another resort.

Nascer Do Sol Resort

Nascer Do Sol Resort

Mom, why does this resort say horses?   We are riding horses today?   Here I am, Zeb the Duck, in the saddle of a very big horse.

I am on a tall horse

I am on a tall horse

You will notice the top of the ladder.   The ladder is for mom and the other humans to mount their horses.   OK, mom’s on the horse, too.

Here we go

Here we go

We are ready to head to the beach to ride along the Indian Ocean.   This is so exciting.   This photo was taken from the back of Bonnie, our horse.

Indian Ocean from back of Bonnie

Indian Ocean from back of Bonnie

The beach and the Indian Ocean are beautiful.   I love this.  We rode our horse on the beach for more than one hour.   I, Zeb the Duck, did not want to get off this horse.   Her name is Bonnie.   But we did get off Bonnie.   Our driver took us back to Tan ‘n Biki Resort where our lunch was ready.   Because we are eating by the Indian Ocean, mom ordered line fish.   That is whatever fish they catch on the fishing lines today.   That is really fresh and tasty.   Our fish was so good.  Of course, we did get the whole fish again.   I am getting used to fish with heads on our plate.   We don’t eat the heads, but many people do.   After our delicious lunch, we wanted to walk on the beach.   Each of the resorts we visited were beautiful.   These are steps going over the sand dunes and on to the the beach.

Stairs to beach

Stairs to beach

Let’s go mom.   I am sitting on the beach and the waves from the Indian Ocean did reach me and I got wet.

I got wet in the Indian Ocean

I got wet in the Indian Ocean

But the water did not pull me out to the ocean.   And mom’s right there to protect me.  Here I am sitting on the boat.

Zeb on the boat in front of picnic shelters

Zeb on the boat in front of picnic shelters

These picnic shelters on the beach protect humans, and small ducks, from the intense tropical sun of the summer.   Even now, during winter in the Southern Hemisphere, the sun is intense.   Too soon it is time for us to get in the resort truck, drive down the sandy roads and get on the ferry.

Waiting for the Nikomati River Ferry to go back to Maputo

Waiting for the Nikomati River Ferry to go back to Maputo

After the Nikomati River Ferry, we took the same route, through the country side, along the Bay of Maputo and into the city of Maputo to our hotel.   This was a wonderful day and a great end to our time in Mozambique.   If you go to Maputo, Mozambique, call Afonso to go to Macaneta Island.   Go for the day, or stay longer at either of these resorts.   You will love it.

Zeb and Eider at Cable Beach Australia for Sunset

Zeb, Eider and the humans arrived in Broome, Western Australia.   After getting a place to sleep, we headed to Cable Beach.

We are at Cable Beach in Broome, Western Australia

We are at Cable Beach in Broome, Western Australia

Broome is on the Indian Ocean and well known for beautiful sunsets.   We did not want to miss it.   Cable Beach is a very wide beach.

Wide beach and you can drive here

Wide beach and you can drive here

Cable Beach pleases swimmers, sunbathers, and even sailboats.

Sailboat with people on beach

Sailboat and people on beach.

Zander’s is the main restaurant on the beach.

Zander's on Cable Beach

Zander’s on Cable Beach

As you can see, this is a popular gathering place to watch the sunset.

This is the place to be for sunsets in Broome

This is the place to be for sunsets in Broome

At Zander’s you can eat in the main restaurant and watch the sunset.   Of course, you will pay for this option.   We sat in the restaurant, since we wanted the full experience.   Hamburgers cost about $20 US, but the location was well worth it to us.

Zander's restaurant. Eat inside or get take away

Zander’s restaurant. Eat inside or get take away

The part on the far right, is for ordering take away food from Zander’s, at a lower price.   You can eat your food while sitting on a few benches outside.    Everyone is ready to watch the sunset.

Anticipating the sunset

Anticipating the sunset

The sun is now setting.

Sun beginning to set in Indian Ocean

Sun beginning to set in Indian Ocean

From the time the setting sun touches the water until it is completely gone is only 90 seconds.

Almost gone

Almost gone

Now, even with the sun gone, this is still a beautiful place and the weather was perfect, so many people still linger here.     It is difficult to leave.

Still warm and beautiful

Still warm and beautiful

We are so happy that we ate at Zander’s and we able to see the famous and beautiful Cable Beach sunset.   We hope you will visit here soon.   It is wonderful.

Zeb and Eider Duck Enjoy Western Australia’s Eighty Mile Beach

Zeb and Eider Duck and the humans arrived at Eighty Mile Beach.

Welcome

Welcome

We stayed in a cabin at Eighty Mile Beach Caravan Park.

Our home for a couple days

Our home for a couple days

In the U.S. we do not believe the RV parks have self-contained cabins for rent.   But in Australia, many of these parks have places for your tent, your camper, cabins with shared facilities and self-contained cabins.   They are great.   As we approached the park, we admired these Australian greeters.

Hello

Hello

Isn’t she adorable?   We love these wallabies.   You may remember that a wallaby looks like a smaller kangaroo.   Our park has this Memorial for Vietnam Veterans.

Vietnam Memorial

Vietnam Memorial

It was officially opened August 18, 2010.   We like memorials that honor those that fought for freedom.   Eighty Mile Beach is the longest uninterrupted beach in Western Australia.   The beach comprises 220 kilometers of coastline between Cape Missiessy and Cape Keraudren.   Let’s see the beach.

Our beach is wide and long

Our beach is wide and long

We enjoy the soft sand and the really wide beach.   Many migratory birds come here in the spring to feed.   Also between June and October humpback whales pass near this beach heading north.   This is the Indian Ocean, but the sea is rather gentle.   Humans can drive on this beach.

Driving on the beach

Driving on the beach

Fishing from the shore is popular with many humans.

Fishing on Eighty Mile Beach

Fishing on Eighty Mile Beach

There are many kinds of shells on this beach.  We ducks like beaches, sand, water and shells.   This is the path to leave the beach and return to our cabin.

Heading back to our cabin

Heading back to our cabin

One time when we left the camp, some of the residents did not want us to leave.

Please don't leave

Please don’t leave

We waited patiently for them and soon they moved for us.   This road sign certainly made us look twice.

What?? Turtle crossing?

What?? Turtle crossing?

Someone altered a speed bump sign.   Flatback turtles do come ashore between October and April to lay eggs, but by the ocean.   Not on the road.   We are enjoying the view from our front porch.   This proud, colorful bird really got the attention of our humans.   Of course, being a fellow bird, we liked him also.

Our feathered friend

Our bright eyed feathered friend

As you can guess, the sunsets here at Eighty Mile Beach on the Indian Ocean, are beautiful.

Beautiful Indian Ocean sunset with a lone fisherman

Beautiful Indian Ocean sunset with a lone fisherman

A great finale to our time at Eighty Mile Beach.

Just beautiful

Just beautiful

Driving from Exmouth to Point Samson, Western Australia with Zeb and Eider Duck

Driving north from Exmouth, Zeb and Eider thought this was one of the best signs ever!

One of the greatest signs ever!

One of the greatest signs ever!

Further north, we spotted these rocks.

Pile of rocks

Pile of rocks

They are just all piled up.   Rather unusual.   We continue to see the many termite hills.

More termite hills

More termite hills

There are thousands of hills, so there must be millions of termites??   Arriving in Onslow, we decide to spend the night here.   Our rooms are on the shore of the Indian Ocean.

Indian Ocean by our cabin

Indian Ocean by our cabin

Aren’t these flowers beautiful?

Flowers in front of our cabin

Flowers in front of our cabin

They are growing by the front of our cabin.   How can these trees grow and not fall down?

Growing sideways?

Growing sideways?

Leaving Onslow, still heading north, we find an Iron Ore mining area.   The real mining area is fenced, but we see this plaque.

Plaque for Mr. Algy Patterson

Plaque for Mr. Algy Patterson

The nearby bridge over the road is the Patterson Bridge, named for Mr. Algy Patterson,  respected elder of the Kuruma and Marthudunera people.   Much land in this part of Australia was owned by the aboriginal people and now Australia calls them traditional owners and they are involved in the use of the land.   This is the case at the iron ore mining site.   This is the Mesa A/Warramboo mine.   Red dirt shows the work being done and the heavy red color of the soil, an indicator of iron ore.

Iron Ore being mined

Iron Ore being mined

Further north, we observed this unusual sculpture.

Unusual sculpture

Unusual sculpture

We stop at Point Samson and admire the lighthouse near our room.

Lighthouse at Point Samson

Lighthouse at Point Samson

These ships are lined up for the docks at Port Hedland.

Ships lined up for Port Hedland

Ships lined up for Port Hedland

The ships will take iron ore to Asia.   We use this path to get to our beach on the Indian Ocean at Point Samson.

Path to beach at Indian Ocean

Path to beach at Indian Ocean

The next town, heading north, is Roebuck.   We really liked these memorials for Australia’s military heroes.   This one is for those that perished during World War I.

Honoring World War I Veterans at Roebuck

Honoring World War I Veterans at Roebuck

This one honors all fallen veterans.

Honoring all veterans. Roebuck, Western Australia

Honoring all veterans. Roebuck, Western Australia

At a rest area we again were amazed at the way trees can grow.

How can they grow like this?

How can they grow like this?

We also love the white bark.   Here is another sculpture by the side of the road.

Unusual road side sculpture

Unusual road side sculpture

We don’t know what it is, but it captured our attention.   Today we have shown you some of the scenery we liked driving up the coast.   Next time we will take you to 80 Mile Beach on the Indian Ocean.

Carnarvon Australia with Zeb and Eider Duck

It was raining when Zeb, Eider, and the humans left Monkey Mia in Shark Bay, Western Australia.   The road was flooded in places, but we were able to drive through.

They drove through the water. So did we!

They drove through the water. So did we!

Apparently the roads flood a lot in the rainy season, and also in the drier winter.  This was a common sign along the road.

Common sign along the road

Common sign along the road

We are still driving north and decided to spend the night in Carnarvon.    Carnarvon is famous for its great climate and banana plantations.   Carnarvon is the commercial center for the rich Gascoyne district.   We went to the historic One Mile Jetty, built by Matthew Price in 1897.

Carnarvon's One Mile Jetty

Carnarvon’s One Mile Jetty

It was built to accommodate State Ships bringing supplies and passengers from Perth and allow the export of livestock and wool from the region.   Today there is great fishing from the jetty.   Nearby is the water tower lookout.

Water Tower Lookout

Water Tower Lookout

From this lookout we saw great views of the mouth of the mighty Gascoyne River.

Indian Ocean from Water tower lookout

Indian Ocean from Water tower lookout

There is also a Railway Museum here.   We liked this restored G-Class dropside railcar from 1884.

Drop side rail car

Drop side rail car

This information carriage was not open when we were here.

Information carriage

Information carriage

These vehicles were interesting.

We like these

We like these

This wagon was much taller then Zeb and Eider.

Big wagon

Big wagon

We especially liked this Coffee Pot train.

Looks like a fun ride

Looks like a fun ride

We could not stay longer in Carnarvon, but it was a very nice and interesting town on the Indian Ocean.

Australia’s Kalbarri National Park with Zeb and Eider Duck

Kalbarri National Park, in Western Australia, has coastal lookouts and look out points over the gulches of Murchison River.    After leaving the Principality of Hutt River, we drove to the Indian Ocean coast toward the town of Kalbarri.   Our first stop in the national park was Grandstand.

From Grandstand Lookout in Kalbarri National Park

From Grandstand Lookout in Kalbarri National Park

We, Zeb and Eider, were very careful because the wind was pretty strong.

We are here too, but it windy

We are here too, but it windy

We loved looking at these cliffs of the Indian Ocean.

Great cliffs to Indian Ocean

Great cliffs to Indian Ocean

Our next stop was at Island Rock.

Island Rock

Island Rock

It really is an island of rock.   Natural Bridge, a little further along the coast, was nice.

Natural Bridge

Natural Bridge

This bridge was formed by the force of the water, cutting through the rock.    Here at Eagle’s Gulch, we admired this beach.

A beach at Eagle's Gulch

A beach at Eagle’s Gulch

This would be a great place for a picnic.   More beautiful views of the Indian Ocean from Pot Alley.

We like Pot Alley. We feel safe here

We like Pot Alley. We feel safer here

As the weather changed, we saw this rainbow.

We love rainbows

We love rainbows

Next morning we drove a little inland to the entrance of Kalbarri National Park.

Kalbarri National Par

Kalbarri National Par

We were fascinated by this plant at the Park Headquarters Building.

Different plant

Different plant

The Murchison River flows through the park, so we had our choice of hiking trails and beautiful views of the gorge.

We hiked this trail

We hiked this trail

This was our first hiking trail.   We enjoyed this view from the trail.

Great view

Great view

After our hike, we drove a little further and saw this emu.

Emu wandering

Emu wandering

This was a pretty view of the Murchison River from Hawks Head Walk.

Murchison River

Murchison River

Since Western Australia is known for wildflowers, so we wanted you to see these flowers near the building.

Everybody loves bright flowers

Everybody loves bright flowers

As we were leaving the park, we enjoyed watching this flock of emu.

Are they sad we are leaving the park?

Are they sad we are leaving the park?

We are really enjoying our drive in Western Australia.   You would enjoy time here also.

Zeb and Eider Duck Drive in Southwestern Australia

Zeb and Eider Duck and the humans rented a car in Perth, Australia.   We are heading north, along the Indian Ocean coastline.   We want to show you some of what we saw the first couple days of driving.   We are meandering up the west coast of Australia, beginning in Perth but our final driving destination is Broome, Australia, on the northwest coast.    We stopped to admire this roadside park overlooking the water.

Picnic area along Indian Ocean

Picnic area along Indian Ocean

The seed pods on this tree were new to us.

Unusual seed pods

Unusual seed pods

These trucks, with more than one trailer, are called road trains.

Road Train

Road Train

We write more about them another day.   These were our first sightings of wild emu.

Our first wild emus

Our first wild emu

It was exciting for us to see them.   Of course, we do not see wild emus in Colorado nor in Alaska.   Driving into the town of Dongara, we stopped at this navigation beacon,

Navigation Beacon at Dongara

Navigation Beacon at Dongara

built commemorate the loss of the Brigantine Leander near this point on November 11, 1853.   The rugged coastline is a reminder of the importance of navigation beacons.

Rocky coast can be treacherous

Rocky coast can be treacherous

Even the water is rather rough here.

Coast at Dongara

Coast at Dongara

Continuing north, we visited Oakabella Homestead, located between Chapman Valley and Northampton.   This is an 1860s heritage-listed beautiful restored homestead.   This is arguably Western Australia’s most haunted house.   Here we met Loretta, formerly of Nova Scotia, Canada.   Loretta took us through the 13 room homestead.   This is the bedroom where the owner, George, accidentally shot himself while cleaning his shotgun.

Bedroom where owner, George, accidentally shot himself

Bedroom where owner, George, accidentally shot himself

Loretta says his spirit, or ghost is often here.

This bedroom belongs to a young woman.   She had a great hat collection.  Her spirit, or ghost is also a frequent visitor.

Former lady's bedroom with hat collection

Former lady’s bedroom with hat collection

This stove still works in the kitchen.   The spirits or ghosts did not like any of the new appliances that were brought in. The all broke within a few days or weeks of their arrival.   The new appliances have been removed and the old ones function very well.

Kitchen. This stove still works.

Kitchen. This stove still works.

This museum building was a former school.

Former school, now museum

Former school, now museum

Mom was fascinated with this collection of ink wells.

Collection of ink wells

Collection of ink wells

This view toward the Oakabella Creek is really nice.

Oakabella Creek behind homestead

Oakabella Creek behind homestead

While walking around in this area, we saw these plants that look like small watermelon.

Maybe wild watermelons

Maybe wild watermelons

Inside the fruit looks like a watermelon, but the fruit is green.

Green inside

Green inside

We also enjoyed seeing this herd of cattle grazing near the Indian Ocean.

Cows grazing near Indian Ocean

Cows grazing near Indian Ocean

This is a Banksia tree.   Here is a variety showing various stages of the pod developing.

Seed pods of various colors and various stages of maturity

Seed pods of various colors and various stages of maturity

First the pods seem to be brown, then turning salmon color.   Then the seeds come off and the pod is white and has a very smooth feel.

After seeds fall, this white part is very soft and smooth

After seeds fall, this white part is very soft and smooth

These really are interesting trees.   These kangaroos were grazing near a housing subdivision.

Kangaroos in field near subdivision

Kangaroos in field near subdivision

We love seeing kangaroos.   We will show you more of the scenery along our west coast drive later, as we continue our northern route.