Derby, Western Australia with Zeb and Eider Duck

In Derby we visited the Wharfinger’s House Museum.

Back terrace of Wharfinger House Museum

Back terrace of Wharfinger House Museum

The Wharfinger is the person who owns or has control of the Wharf.  This is an example of prefabricated wooden housing of the 1920s and 1930s.   There are three sections of this museum:  shipping, communication and aviation.  This canoe from Sunday Island is great.

Canoe from Sunday Island found in marsh area near Derby

Canoe from Sunday Island found in marsh area near Derby

Makes us want to go for a canoe ride.   Oh no!   This is a dentist’s drill?

Dentist Drill??

Dentist Drill??

Makes the Colorado Traveling Ducks glad they do not have people teeth.    Walking around Derby we found the Old Derby Gaol.   The Old Derby Gaol is located next to the current police station.

Old Derby Gaol

Old Derby Gaol

This original prison, or gaol, was often overcrowded and without proper sanitation facilities.   Many prisoners were chained to the floor to prevent movement and escape.

Prisoners were chained to floor

Prisoners were chained to floor

The signs in this area say that most of the prisoners were aboriginals.

Lots of information here

Lots of information here

Near the wharf we saw the Old Derby Woolshed and the Derby Historic Tramway Project.

Historic Woolshed and Tramway

Historic Woolshed and Tramway

The old equipment from the tramway was real interesting.

Old equipment

Old equipment

The tides at the jetty vary greatly.   These tides are Australia’s highest, with tidal variations being as much as 11 meters.   These photos are near low tide.

Low tide

Low tide

Low tide

Low tide

These photos are near high tide.

High tide

High tide

High tide

High tide

The jetty is also a great place to watch the sunset.

Another beautiful sunset on the Indian Ocean

Another beautiful sunset on the Indian Ocean

We love sunsets!   We enjoyed our visit to Derby, Australia.   We think you would enjoy Derby also, but go during the winter if you can.   Summer brings rain and flooding during The Wet.

Zeb and Eider Duck Drive to Derby, Western Australia

Zeb, Eider, and the humans are driving to Derby.    We will stay over night in Derby and then return to Broome.   This sign is not too important today, but it is very important during the summer or rainy season.

Important sign during The Wet

Important sign during The Wet

They call the rainy season The Wet.    Much of this area will be flooded and closed.   The termites have really been busy here.   Lots of additions, maybe a termite town?

Termite hill. They keep adding to this hill

Termite hill. They keep adding to this hill

Approaching Broome, we stop at the Boab Prison Tree.

Prison Boab Tree

Prison Boab Tree

This tree is believed to be about 1500 years old, and has a girth of 14 meters.   The trunk of the tree has been slit and much of the trunk was hollowed out to place prisoners inside.   Prisoners were put inside the tree while being transported from one area to another.

Tree was slit so prisoners could be inside

Tree was slit so prisoners could be inside

In this same location, we saw the longest cattle trough.

Longest cattle trough

Longest cattle trough

Built in 1917, it is 120 meters long and could handle 500 cattle at a time.   Water to the cattle trough is now pumped by this windmill.

Windmill

Windmill

We really liked these Boab trees.

Fascinating trees. We will not see them in many other parts of Australia

Fascinating trees. We will not see them in many other parts of Australia

They grow only in the Kimberley region of Western Austraia and in the Victoria and Fitzmaurice river basins in the Northern Territory.   Africa and the island of Madagascar also have Boab trees.   The fruit of the tree contains malic, tartaric and ascorbic acids.

Nut of Boab tree

Nut of Boab tree

The seeds have high protein value.   The pulp is eaten dry or mixed with water as a beverage.   The Boab nut is also often carved and decorated to be purchased by tourists.   We will only see these Boab trees for a short time, so we are really looking at them.   We visited the nearby Mowanjum Art and Culture Center.

Here we are. Mowanjum Art and Culture Center

Here we are. Mowanjum Art and Culture Center

This is an example of newer aboriginal rock painting.

Newer aboriginal art

Newer aboriginal art

There is a Boab tree at the Mowanjum Center.

Mowanjum Center has a Boab tree

Mowanjum Center has a Boab tree

Carved and decorated Boab nuts are available for purchase.

Decorated Boab Nuts

Decorated Boab Nuts

We saw and learned at the Mowanjum Center.   You will like it if you visit.   Next time we will show you what we found in Derby.

Zeb and Eider Explore Broome, Western Australia

Broome was built on the pearl industry.    Streeter’s Jetty was an important part of this industry.

Streeter's Jetty

Streeter’s Jetty

Now it is a great pier to walk and admire Roebuck Bay.

We are going to explore Streeter's Jetty

We are going to explore Streeter’s Jetty

At the end of Streeter’s Jetty we see Roebuck Bay.

Out to Roebuck Bay

Out to Roebuck Bay

Wandering through town, we discover this shady area and inviting table.   It is time for a snack.

Beverages??

Beverages??

After a refreshing beverage, we found these statues and memorial to the Hard Hat Divers of the pearl industry.   Statue is great, but dark in this photo.

Hard hat pearl diver

Hard hat pearl diver

Diving for pearls is a difficult and dangerous job.

Honoring and remembering pearl divers

Honoring and remembering pearl divers

Broome is a rather small town, and  popular tourist destination, so traffic can be a problem, especially for the residents.   We thought this sign was rather clever, putting the drivers first.

Vehicles have right of way here

Vehicles have right of way here

A few blocks further, we liked this statue honoring the women who took care of the homes and children while waiting for the pearl divers to return.

Pearl industry honors women

Pearl industry honors women

Again, mom is fascinated by the beautiful birds seen here.

Love the beautiful birds

Love the beautiful birds

Broome, like so many towns in Australia, remembers and honors their veterans.   We liked Bedford Memorial Park.

Bedford Memorial Park

Bedford Memorial Park

This monument honors those lost during the first air raid on Broome during World War II.

Remembering Broome's first air raid of World War II

Remembering Broome’s first air raid of World War II

This raid killed many women and children civilians, mostly refugees from the Dutch East Indies, now Indonesia.   After this air raid, the city of Broome was evacuated.   Continuing along the coast, we stopped at this small museum.

Broome Museum

Broome Historical Museum

Wow!  A time capsule, once opened, had been changed and resealed December, 2000.   It will be reopened November 32, 2033.

Broome Time Capsule

Broome Time Capsule

It will a reminder of how many things have changed during those 33 years.   We would love to be there to see the contents in 2033.   Broome is a very nice town with friendly people.   We ate terrific homemade ice cream.   We even met owners of a souvenir shop that had recently visited Colorado.   We like Broome and would be happy to return here.   You would like it also, we think.

Zeb and Eider at Cable Beach Australia for Sunset

Zeb, Eider and the humans arrived in Broome, Western Australia.   After getting a place to sleep, we headed to Cable Beach.

We are at Cable Beach in Broome, Western Australia

We are at Cable Beach in Broome, Western Australia

Broome is on the Indian Ocean and well known for beautiful sunsets.   We did not want to miss it.   Cable Beach is a very wide beach.

Wide beach and you can drive here

Wide beach and you can drive here

Cable Beach pleases swimmers, sunbathers, and even sailboats.

Sailboat with people on beach

Sailboat and people on beach.

Zander’s is the main restaurant on the beach.

Zander's on Cable Beach

Zander’s on Cable Beach

As you can see, this is a popular gathering place to watch the sunset.

This is the place to be for sunsets in Broome

This is the place to be for sunsets in Broome

At Zander’s you can eat in the main restaurant and watch the sunset.   Of course, you will pay for this option.   We sat in the restaurant, since we wanted the full experience.   Hamburgers cost about $20 US, but the location was well worth it to us.

Zander's restaurant. Eat inside or get take away

Zander’s restaurant. Eat inside or get take away

The part on the far right, is for ordering take away food from Zander’s, at a lower price.   You can eat your food while sitting on a few benches outside.    Everyone is ready to watch the sunset.

Anticipating the sunset

Anticipating the sunset

The sun is now setting.

Sun beginning to set in Indian Ocean

Sun beginning to set in Indian Ocean

From the time the setting sun touches the water until it is completely gone is only 90 seconds.

Almost gone

Almost gone

Now, even with the sun gone, this is still a beautiful place and the weather was perfect, so many people still linger here.     It is difficult to leave.

Still warm and beautiful

Still warm and beautiful

We are so happy that we ate at Zander’s and we able to see the famous and beautiful Cable Beach sunset.   We hope you will visit here soon.   It is wonderful.

Zeb and Eider Duck Enjoy Western Australia’s Eighty Mile Beach

Zeb and Eider Duck and the humans arrived at Eighty Mile Beach.

Welcome

Welcome

We stayed in a cabin at Eighty Mile Beach Caravan Park.

Our home for a couple days

Our home for a couple days

In the U.S. we do not believe the RV parks have self-contained cabins for rent.   But in Australia, many of these parks have places for your tent, your camper, cabins with shared facilities and self-contained cabins.   They are great.   As we approached the park, we admired these Australian greeters.

Hello

Hello

Isn’t she adorable?   We love these wallabies.   You may remember that a wallaby looks like a smaller kangaroo.   Our park has this Memorial for Vietnam Veterans.

Vietnam Memorial

Vietnam Memorial

It was officially opened August 18, 2010.   We like memorials that honor those that fought for freedom.   Eighty Mile Beach is the longest uninterrupted beach in Western Australia.   The beach comprises 220 kilometers of coastline between Cape Missiessy and Cape Keraudren.   Let’s see the beach.

Our beach is wide and long

Our beach is wide and long

We enjoy the soft sand and the really wide beach.   Many migratory birds come here in the spring to feed.   Also between June and October humpback whales pass near this beach heading north.   This is the Indian Ocean, but the sea is rather gentle.   Humans can drive on this beach.

Driving on the beach

Driving on the beach

Fishing from the shore is popular with many humans.

Fishing on Eighty Mile Beach

Fishing on Eighty Mile Beach

There are many kinds of shells on this beach.  We ducks like beaches, sand, water and shells.   This is the path to leave the beach and return to our cabin.

Heading back to our cabin

Heading back to our cabin

One time when we left the camp, some of the residents did not want us to leave.

Please don't leave

Please don’t leave

We waited patiently for them and soon they moved for us.   This road sign certainly made us look twice.

What?? Turtle crossing?

What?? Turtle crossing?

Someone altered a speed bump sign.   Flatback turtles do come ashore between October and April to lay eggs, but by the ocean.   Not on the road.   We are enjoying the view from our front porch.   This proud, colorful bird really got the attention of our humans.   Of course, being a fellow bird, we liked him also.

Our feathered friend

Our bright eyed feathered friend

As you can guess, the sunsets here at Eighty Mile Beach on the Indian Ocean, are beautiful.

Beautiful Indian Ocean sunset with a lone fisherman

Beautiful Indian Ocean sunset with a lone fisherman

A great finale to our time at Eighty Mile Beach.

Just beautiful

Just beautiful

Driving from Exmouth to Point Samson, Western Australia with Zeb and Eider Duck

Driving north from Exmouth, Zeb and Eider thought this was one of the best signs ever!

One of the greatest signs ever!

One of the greatest signs ever!

Further north, we spotted these rocks.

Pile of rocks

Pile of rocks

They are just all piled up.   Rather unusual.   We continue to see the many termite hills.

More termite hills

More termite hills

There are thousands of hills, so there must be millions of termites??   Arriving in Onslow, we decide to spend the night here.   Our rooms are on the shore of the Indian Ocean.

Indian Ocean by our cabin

Indian Ocean by our cabin

Aren’t these flowers beautiful?

Flowers in front of our cabin

Flowers in front of our cabin

They are growing by the front of our cabin.   How can these trees grow and not fall down?

Growing sideways?

Growing sideways?

Leaving Onslow, still heading north, we find an Iron Ore mining area.   The real mining area is fenced, but we see this plaque.

Plaque for Mr. Algy Patterson

Plaque for Mr. Algy Patterson

The nearby bridge over the road is the Patterson Bridge, named for Mr. Algy Patterson,  respected elder of the Kuruma and Marthudunera people.   Much land in this part of Australia was owned by the aboriginal people and now Australia calls them traditional owners and they are involved in the use of the land.   This is the case at the iron ore mining site.   This is the Mesa A/Warramboo mine.   Red dirt shows the work being done and the heavy red color of the soil, an indicator of iron ore.

Iron Ore being mined

Iron Ore being mined

Further north, we observed this unusual sculpture.

Unusual sculpture

Unusual sculpture

We stop at Point Samson and admire the lighthouse near our room.

Lighthouse at Point Samson

Lighthouse at Point Samson

These ships are lined up for the docks at Port Hedland.

Ships lined up for Port Hedland

Ships lined up for Port Hedland

The ships will take iron ore to Asia.   We use this path to get to our beach on the Indian Ocean at Point Samson.

Path to beach at Indian Ocean

Path to beach at Indian Ocean

The next town, heading north, is Roebuck.   We really liked these memorials for Australia’s military heroes.   This one is for those that perished during World War I.

Honoring World War I Veterans at Roebuck

Honoring World War I Veterans at Roebuck

This one honors all fallen veterans.

Honoring all veterans. Roebuck, Western Australia

Honoring all veterans. Roebuck, Western Australia

At a rest area we again were amazed at the way trees can grow.

How can they grow like this?

How can they grow like this?

We also love the white bark.   Here is another sculpture by the side of the road.

Unusual road side sculpture

Unusual road side sculpture

We don’t know what it is, but it captured our attention.   Today we have shown you some of the scenery we liked driving up the coast.   Next time we will take you to 80 Mile Beach on the Indian Ocean.

Exmouth Australia During World War II with Zeb and Eider

During World War II Australia and the United States often worked together.   Remember that the United States entered World War II after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941.   The US declared war on Japan.   In 1942 the US had ships docking in Fremantle, Australia which is southwest, near Perth.   A refueling port further north was needed for the submarines.   The US and Australia each built bases near Exmouth.

Operation Potshot Monument

Operation Potshot Monument

The US stayed here from 1942-1944.    The two countries worked very close in this area.

Balls of Steel

Balls of Steel

These balls of Steel, or ball float, were anchored in the nearby Gulf and used as a mooring point by boats or barges involved in Operation Potshot.

Zeb and Eider visited the site of the former US basis, called Operation Potshot.   At this monument, there are several signs explaining the differences and similarities of conditions for the soldiers from each country.

Operation Potshot Monument

Operation Potshot Monument

We think you would find these signs interesting.   During this time the Japanese military was very aggressive in southeast Asia.   Japan had moved through Thailand, into Malaysia and Singapore.   Singapore is very close to northern Australia.   During World War II Japan bombed northern Australia very heavily.

Australia attacked by Japanese

Australia attacked by Japanese

Broome and Darwin were frequent targets.   Operation Jaywalk, a joint effort of 14 men from Australia and Britain, left Exmouth from the US base, September 2, 1943.

Tank Float

Tank Float

Tank floats were steel pontoons hitched together to form floating docks.

These men conducted a raid on the Japanese ships in Singapore.   As  result, 7 Japanese ships sank or were seriously damaged.   All 14 men returned to the US Base at Exmouth October 19, 1943.

From Operation Jaywick

From Operation Jaywick

From Operation Jaywick

From Operation Jaywick also

The US base was heavily damaged during the Cyclone of February 3, 1945.   We, the Colorado Traveling are not history experts, but we are happy to see that both countries were able to work together to help end World War II.

Operation Potshot

Operation Potshot

These monuments are very interesting and informative.

Submarines need refueling port

Submarines need refueling port

We think they would be worth some of your time when you are in the area of Exmouth, Western Australia.   Standing by the monuments, the Indian Ocean in on one side and sheep grazing in a pasture are on the other side.

We love this guy

We love this guy

We like seeing all the sheep.

Grazing sheep

Grazing sheep

More peaceful now than during the war.

Operation Potshot Monument

Operation Potshot Monument